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FL3 

Alachua 

61 

1984/1 

C.2 



y^LACHUk COUNFY 

Department of 
Planning & DeNelopment 




1 



RESOLUTION 84-14 

A RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY 
COMMISSIONERS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, 
FLORIDA, ADOPTING THE REVISION TO THE 
LAND USE ELEMENT OF THE ALACHUA 
COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING 
AN EFFECTIVE DATE. 

WHEREAS, in 1978, the Board of County Conunissioners of 
Alachua County adopted a comprehensive development plan to provide 
for the County's future growth; and, 

WHEREAS, the Local Government Comprehensive Planning Act 
requires the County to periodically evaluate and appraise its Com- 
prehensive Plan; and, 

WHEREAS, the Board recognizes that planning should be a 
continuous and ongoing process; and, 

WHEREAS, the Board has received and considered the 
report of the Alachua County Local Planning Agency, entitled 
"Evaluation and Appraisal of the Land Use Element", with recom- 
mended revisions to the Future Land Use Element of the Alachua 
County Comprehensive Plan; and, 

WHEREAS, the Board has received and considered the writ- 
ten comments of the state land planning agency and the regional 
planning agency in regard to revisions to the Future Land Use Ele- 
ment of the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan; and, 

WHEREAS, the Board has received and considered the 
recommendations of the Alachua County Department of Planning and 
Development with regard to revisions to the Future Land Use Ele- 
ment of the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan; and, 

WHEREAS, the Board has held duly noticed public hearings 
for the purpose of providing public participation in the evalua- 
tion and revision of the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan; and, 

WHEREAS, the Board has received and considered the writ- 
ten and oral comments of the public in regard to amending the 
Alachua County Comprehensive Plan; 



Il 



NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY 
COMMISSIONERS OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA: 

1. That the Board of County Conunissioners of Alachua 
County does hereby adopt the revision to the Land Use Element of 
the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan which is attached hereto and 
made a part hereof by reference. 

2. The revised Land Use Element of the Alachua County 
Comprehensive Plan shall become effective on the 1st day of 

August , A.D., 1984. 

DULY ADOPTED in special session, this / — day of 
February, A.D., 1984. 



ATTEST: 




^ . (Jce^^JtZIra yg^nAA^i,*^^ 



A. Curtis Powers, Clerk 
(SEAL) 



BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF 
ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA 




Thomas Coward, Chairman 



TABLE OP CONTENTS 



LIST OP PIGURES AND TABLES v 

INTRODUCTION 1 

Trends for the 1980's 1 

Future Urban Form 3 

Basic Principles 5 

Goals and Objectives 7 

Future Population 9 

Development Framework 9 

1 .0 URBAN RESIDENTIAL POLICIES 13 

General 15 

Density 16 

Location and Ccmpatibility 17 

Urban Residential Densities 19 

Design and Site Standards 20 

Required Facilities 22 

2 .0 URBAN ACTIVITY CENTER POLICIES 23 

General 25 

Hi^ Activity Center 25 

Medium Activity Center 26 

Low Activity Center 26 

Rural Activity Center 26 

University of Florida Activity Center 26 

Design and Site Standards 26 

3.0 COMMERCIAL POLICIES 27 

General 29 

Location and Compatibility 30 

Required Facilities and Services 30 

Roadway Commercial 30 

Regional Shopping Center 31 

Community Shopping Center 33 

Nei^borhood Shopping Center 34 

Nei^borhood Convenience Center 35 

Office 36 

Tourist /Entertainment 36 

Rural Commercial 37 

4.0 INDUSTRIAL POLICIES 39 

General 41 

Location and Conpatibility 41 

Design and Site Standards 42 

Required Facilities and Services 42 



11 



5.0 INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES 45 

General 47 

Location and Conpatibility 47 

Educational Facilities 48 

Libraries 48 

Fire Protection 48 

Law Enforcement 49 

Emergency Medical Service 49 

Health Facilities 49 

Public Services 49 

Canmunity Service Or^nizations 49 

6.0 RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE POLICIES 51 

General 53 

Location and Conpatibility 53 

Design and Site Standards 53 

7.0 RURAL POLICIES 51 

General 57 

Agriculture 57 

Rural Activity Centers 57 

Rural Employment Centers 58 

Rural Clusters 58 

Rural Residential 59 

8.0 CONSERVATION POLICIES 61 

General 63 

Location and Compatibility 64 

Permitted Uses 64 

Design and Site Standards 65 

Development Regulations 65 

9.0 AIRPORT IMPACT POLICIES 67 

General 69 

Development Policies 69 

10.0 NEW COMMUNITY POLICIES 71 

General 73 

Density 73 

Location and Compatibility 74 

Design and Site Standards 74 

Required Facilities 74 



111 



r 

L 



I 

[ 
L 



1 1 .0 IMPLMENTATION 75 

General 77 

Urban Residential 78 

Activity Centers 79 

Institutional 80 

Recreation and Open Space 80 

Conservation 80 

Roadways 80 

Potable Water and Sanitary Sewer 81 

Mass Transit 81 

Development Regulations 81 

Process for Continued Revision of the Plan S3 

Consistency of Elements 84 

Annexations 84 

Residential Density Checklist 85 

Points/Density Conversion Table 86 

Compatibility Matrix 87 

Buffer Group Matrix 88 

Appendix A - Average Daily Traffic Generation Rates 89 

Appendix B - Activity Center Maps 95 

Keyword Index 111 

Glossary 119 



IV 



LIST OF FIGURES 
Figure Page 

• 

A Trends in Households 2 

B Alternative Urban Forms 3 

C Compatible Development 6 

D Alachua County Planning Districts 12 

E Separation Using Physical Barriers 18 

F Transitional Uses 18 

Gr Compatible Intensity 21 

H Roadway Commercial Infill 31 

I Regional Shopping Center 32 

J Conraunity Shopping Center 33 

K Nei^borhood Shopping Center 34 

Oaks Mall Activity Center 95 

Gainesville Mall Activity Center 96 

Millhopper Activity Center 97 

Archer Road and S.W. 34th Street Activity Center 98 

N.W. 39th Avenue and 1-75 Activity Center 99 

Ridgeway Activity Center 1 00 

Williston Road and S.W. 13th Street Activity Center 101 

Santa Fe Conmunity College Activity Center 1 02 

N.E. 39th Avenue and North Main Street Activity Center 103 

Williston Road and 1-75 Activity Center 1 04 

East^te Activity Center 1 05 

Alachua Activity Center 1 06 

Hi^ Springs Activity Center 1 07 

High Springs Plaza Activity Center 108 

Havrthorne Activity Center 1 09 



LIST OF TABLES 
Table Page 

1 Alachua County Population Projections 11 

2 Residential Density Checklist 85 

3 Points/Density Conversion Table 86 

4 Canpatibility Matrix 87 

5 Buffer Group Matrix 88 

6 Trip Generation Rates 91 



»] 



LNTTRODUCTION 



New development on the urban fringe of the City of Gainesville, has, and 
will, take many different physical forms. The nature of this growth will have 
a significant impact on the total amount of fiscal resources needed to 
accomodate future growth. Traditional comprehensive planning has attempted to 
coordinate growth throu^ the use of static assumptions made on a dynamic urban 
system. In the past in Alachua County, these assumptions were illustrated 
throu^ the use of a static land use map that required constant amendment. 

TRENDS FOR THE 80'S 

Changes are occuring every day that will significantly affect the quality 
of development in the 1980's. Americans are re-evaluating decisions on • where 
to live, work, shop and spend leisure time based on econcmic trends and 
changing values. The Alachua County community must adapt to these changing 
trends and values. Many choices that were available in the 1960's and 1970's 
have become limited because of the following trends: 

1 ) Energy - rising costs and supply problems; 

2) Increasing costs of Housing; 

3) Economic and Social Mobility; 

4) Changing Preferences in Housing and Location; 

5) Resistance to Change; 

6) The Need for Efficient Provision of Public Services; 

7) Increasing Competition for Land; 

8) Protecting the Natural Environment: 

Source: Adapted from The Affordable Conmunity , ULI, 1982. 



Many of these trends combined with the changing social characteristics of 
the population are affecting the size and composition of households. The 1980's 
will bring growth in the 25-44 a^e group — the prime homebuying age — that will 
dramatically increase the number of households in Alachua County. (See Figure 
A). One parent households, single households and households composed of 
unrelated individuals are increasing in numbers. The growth management 
objectives of Alachua County moist accomodate these changes. 



Flguro A 




1970-80 



Source: The Bureau of Economic and Business 
Research, University of Florida, 1982 



1980-90 



Changes in the composition of households will also place higher demand on 
public services. Roads, schools, public protection, sewer and water, mass 
transit and parks will have to keep pace with the growing number of dwelling 
units. While the costs of financing and building new public facilities is 
growing rapidly, the public is demanding a cap on expenditures. Many 
communities are realizing that public revenues are not providing the necessary 
financing for essential urban services. These factors, combined with hi^ 



♦Figure A shows that this age group, which grew by 50.7 percent between 1970 
and 1980, will grow by 75-3 percent between 1980 and 1990. 



inflation, require that most jurisdictions re-evaluate their dispersed, low 
density urhan form. 

FUTURE URBAN FORM 

Three alternative urban forms were evaluated for the purposes of Future 
Land Use. (See Figure B). The first, Compact City, would limit the 
growth of the urban fringe to today's boundaries and thus establish high 
density development for the County's cities. The Corridor approach closely 
corresponds to traditional low density sprawl. The third form. Urban Cluster, 
anticipates the County having several hi^ intensity activity centers with 
decreasing intensity away from those nodes. The Urban Cluster form is a 
compromise between the Corridor and Compact City concepts that recognizes the 
need to increase the efficiency of public service provision while allowing 
flexibility in choice of housing and location. 



Figuro B 



1. Compact 



ALTERNATIVE URBAN FORMS 



2. Corridor 



Jl_ 



"M" 



!!5Ma 




county 



3. Cluster 




Puijure Land Use assumes the posture that the Urban Cluster configuration is 
the ideal urban form for Alachua County. Taking into account that the urban 
infrastructure is constantly growing in different directions and to varying 
degrees, the Urban Cluster configuration is a dynamic shape that will evolve 
according to both public and private investment decisions. 

The more dwellings per acre, the more effective public services can be 
provided. The greater the dispersion of development, the greater the public 
and private costs for maintaining that system. Cluster type development tends 
to lower housing costs as well as promote energy savings and the more efficient 
use of public infrastructure. 

The factors that will shape the man-made landscape of Alachua County are 
diverse. Future Land Use eliminates the long-standing practice of dictating 
housing structure type throu^ the i:ise of specialized categories for 
development. Instead, the policies and standards set forth in this document 
guide intensity of development within broad land use classifications. As 
market forces change, and investments are made in new areas, the intensity of 
allowable development increases. However, as is always the case with Future 
Land Use, the presence of established residential areas influences final 
decisions as to the compatibility of new development. 






BASIC PRINCIPLES 

Future Land use is designed to promote land development that maximizes the 
use of public investments in facilities and services while preserving existing 
amenities. The 1990*s will emerge as an era of steady population growth and 
lagging tax revenues for Alachua County. The instruments for growth management 
detailed in this document provide the means to ensure that the following three 
basic principles of growth management are met: 

1 ) New growth is accomodated with the proper level of public services ; 

2) The recognition of existing residential nei^borhoods as a 
collective vested interest for all residents of the county; 

3) The fragile environmental quality of North Florida is not signifi- ' 
cantly altered. 

GROWTH AND PUBLIC SERVICES (BASIC PRINCIPLE #1 ) : 

The Residential Density Checklist (see page 85) is the backbone of the 
growth management objectives of Future Land Use. The intensity of new 
development will be directly proportional to the availability of existing or 
programmed public infrastructure. The capital facilities and services that 
comprise public infrastructure in Alachua County are: 

1 ) Activity Centers 

2) Roads 

3) Water Supply 

4) Sanitary Sewer 

5) Public Protection (Snergency Medical Service and Fire Protection). 

6) Mass Transit 

7) Public Schools 

8) Public Parks and Recreation Facilities 



Activity Centers are included on the Residential Density Checklist because they 
contain concentrations of public investment in infrastructure. Encouraging 
development close to these Centers also reduces overall community energy costs. 

EXISTING NEIGHBORHOODS (BASIC PRINCIPLE #2 ) : 

Past decisions concerning land use intensity were not examined in light of 
a Residential Density Checklist. There will be several areas in Alachua County 
that have either developed at hi^er or lower than appropriate densities 
according to the principles established in this Plan. Future Land Use embodies 
a Ccmpatibility Matrix that adjusts all density determinations based on the 
character of surrounding nei^borhoods. The combinations of the Checklist and 
Ccmpatibility Matrix will ensure that residential development occurs according 
to appropriate infrastructure and in concert with existing neighborhoods. 



Figuro C 



INCOMPATIBLE 

high density 




COMPATIBLE 'STEP DOWN' OF RESIDENTIAL DENSITY 



high density 



medium ■~-~<^ 
density 




low/ density 



Th« Compatibility Matrix (Table 4) is dasigned to enaura that new 
davalopmant occurs in concert with existing neighborhoods. 
*8tep down* describes the decreaaing intenaity of land uae. 



ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY (BASIC PRINCIPLE #5 ) : 



Future Land Use is designed to place the environmental integrity of Alachua 
County in the forefront of all development proposals. The Conservation 
policies of this document identify the environmentally sensitive zones of the 
County according to topography, vegetation, flood hazard, management areas, 
soils, and aquifer recharge areas. This document mandates protection of 
conservation areas "by limiting uses to low intensity development. Further 
refinement of conservation Policies and Standards are contained in the 
Conservation Element of the Comprehensive Plan. 

GOAL AND OBJECTIVES : 

The Residential Density Checklist establishes a set of community standards 
for residential development. These standards can be applied to all development 
requests in a uniform manner, so that an efficient level of public expenditures 
are made for varying levels of land use intensity. The Compatibility Matrix 
will ensure that development occurs in a scale with existing nei^borhoods. 
The Conservation policies establish the prime importance of the environmental 
quality of the County for the future. These three basic principles will 
implement the following Goal and Objectives for land use: 



GOAL: TO ENCOURAGE THE ORDERLY, HARMONIOUS, AND JUDICIOUS USE OP LAND. 



Objectives ; 



1 . To ensure conversion of land to urban uses in an orderly fashion 
by: 

a. applying the urban cluster configuration in the Land Use 
Plan; 

b. providing land use regulations (such as PUD) which will 
promote innovative design of development; 

0. developing policies for achieving an optimum balance 
between urban development and agricultural use of land; and 

d. timing development with the availability of infrastructure. 

2. Protect land uses from encroachment of incompatible land use 
types. 

3. Utilize land not required for urban use in a manner to encourage 
maintenance of a viable agricultural industry. 

4. Encourage land use patterns conducive to neighborhood development. 

5- Encourage neighborhood identity and allegiance within appropriate 
urban and rural sectors of the county by: 

a. implementing land use patterns which invite social and 
economic diversity within nei^borhood populations and living 
conditions; 

b. developing public education, recreation, cultural facilities 
and commercial centers oriented to the needs of neighborhood 
populations; 

c. preserving architectural and scenic features which strengthen 
the unique and individual identity of neighborhoods; 

d. providing for phased and orderly growth of nei^borhoods 
consonant with public facilities and the needs and 
development of alternative neigjiborhoods; and 

e. encouraging redevelopment of bligihted areas. 

6. Provide for the redefinition of these objectives as trends and 
issues concerning land use change. 



8 



FUTURE POPULATION 

Alachua County is increasingly becoming an expanding and complex urban 
system. The former agriculturally-based environs of the City of Gainesville 
have evolved into a medium sized American metropolitan area. The direction of 
the growth has been in a westerly-southwesterly orientation and that trend is 
expected to continue. The future spatial distribution of population for each 
Planning District shown in Figure D has been projected as described in Table 1 . 

Future Land Use is a long rangp plan that is designed to manage growth 
forthe next twenty years according ' to the three Basic Principles. The 
policiesestablished in this document strive to shape future growth rather than 
attempting to mandate an inflexible approach to development. This plan can 
best be described as a statement of the public's policies towards future growth 
developed in the best interest of the citizens of Alachua County. 

Vfliile the expected trend is for generally a westward expansion of 
Gainesville, the policies in this Plan support a more balanced development and 
encourage expansion to the east and southeast. The policies also support 
greater emphasis on infill development. 

DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 

'By its very nature, Futur e Land Use 2000 provides a framework for 
determining the impact of public infrastructure decisions. The future location 
of a school, the routing of a bus line or the siting of sewer and water lines 
will affect the development potential of a parcel of land and the future nature 
of a nei^borhood or a complete planning district. The Board of County 
Commissioners can direct future growth throu^ public investment decisions. 

In order to manage and direct the County's growth, a pre-established set of 
priorities for public facility investments should alert the community of the 



intentions of the Board of County Commissioners with re^rd to growth. The 
vehicle for implementing the Comprehensive Plan's development priorities is the 
Capital Improvement Program (C.I.P.)* The annual update of the C.I. P. will 
allow the ccmmunity the ability to evaluate public facility decisions and their 
impact on land use. 

The following priorities are identified in order to further implement the 
urban cluster concept and to support infill development. 

Public facility improvements shall be made in accordance with the 
following priorities: 

1 ) in areas where the lack of public facilities threatens the health 
and safety of the community; 

2) in urban aras that are lacking adequate public facilities to meet 
the needs of existing development and to encoura^ infill 
development ; 

3) in new areas which are part of a planned expansion of public 
services to encourage growth; and 

4) to extend individual services to meet the demands created by a 
specific development. 

The development framework priorities, when combined with the Basic 
Principles, will ensure that urban development occurs throu^ maximizing the 
use of existing infrastructure and by minimizing the cost of providing 
additional services. 



10 



Table 1 



Alachua County Population Projections 



PLANNING 


1980 










DIS'l-KICT 


Census 


1985 


1990 


1995 


2000 


City of 












Gainesville 


81,371 


83,979 


86,587 


94,327 


102,067 


12 


2,804 


3,467 


4,129 


4,499 


4,868 


13 


2,946 


4,077 


5,208 


5,778 


6,347 


14 


11,999 


13,898 


15,796 


17,674 


19,552 


15 


4,529 


8,742 


12,955 


14,791 


16,627 


16* 


3,584 


5,340 


7,095 


8,154 


9,212 


17* 


407 


812 


1,216 


1,445 


1,674 


18 


5,484 


6.316 


7,148 


8,263 


9,377 


19* 


1,873 


2,319 


2,764 


3,441 


4,117 


20 


860 


1,500 


2,140 


2,724 


3,308 


Unincorp. 












GUA** 


34,486 


46,471 


58,451 


66,769 


75,082 


Total 












GUA** 


115,857 


130,450 


145,038 


161,096 


177,149 


21 


5,691 


7,514 


9,320 


10,721 


12,115 


22 


4,296 


5,672 


7,036 


8,092 


9,145 


23 


3,301 


4.357 


5,406 


6,218 


7,027 


24 


1,472 


1,942 


2,410 


2,772 


3,133 


25 


8,420 


10.665 


13,085 


15.070 


17,047 


Unincx)rp. 












Rufal 


23,180 


30,150 


37,257 


42,873 


48,468 


Total 












Unincorp. 


57,666 


76,621 


95,708 


109,642 


123,550 


Srall 












Cities 


12,311 


14,051 


15,637 


17,255 


18.899 


Total 












Rural 


35,491 


44,652 


53,595 


60,917 


68,244 


County 


151,369 


174,651 


197,932 


221,224 


244,516 



Source: Aladiua County Department of Planning and Develcpment, 
1982, North Central Florida Regional Planning Council, 
1981. 

♦Figures shown are for unincorporated areas. 
**(3JA = Gainesville Urban Area 



11 



Figure 



Alachua County Planning Districts 




NOTE: Rural Planning DIatricts do not Include municipalities 



12 



Urban Residential 
Policies 




FUTURE 

MND 

USE 

Vim 



1- 



1 .0 URBAN RESIDENTIAL POLICIES 

1 .1 . GENERAL 

1.1.1. The development of residential land should* be timed and 
sta^d in conjunction with the economic and efficient 
provision of supporting community facilities, such as 
streets, utilities, police and fire protection service, 
emergency medical service, mass transit, public schools, 
recreation and open space, and the development of commercial 
and industrial operations. 

1.1.2. Mobile homes should* be recognized as a legitimate solution 
to the need for low and moderate income housing. Mobile 
homes meeting current health and safety standards as well as 
community appearance standards should be provided for in 
development regulations. 

1.1.3. Location of mobile home parks and subdivisions should 
consider density limits as provided in this Plan, as well as 
community appearance. 

1.1.4. Multi-family developments, mobile home parks, and planned 
unit developments shall be designed to provide,, but not 
limited to: 

a. adequate area for off-street parking; 

b. open space areas and developed recreation facilities; 
and 

c. buffering between the development and adjacent land 
uses where appropriate. 

1 .1 .5. Urban Residential development situated adjacent to 
Interstate 75 shall be adequately buffered to attenuate 
traffic noise. 

1.1.6. Urban Residential development shall be consistent with the 
conservation policies of Alachua County. 

1 .1 .7 Hi^er urban densities than what is determined by the 
Residential Density Checklist may be allowed for housing as 
established by policies in the Housing Element of the 
Comprehensive Plan. 



* For the purposes of this Plan, "should" means discretionary and "shall" means 
mandatory compliance with the corresponding statement. 



15 



1 .2 DENSITY 



1.2.1. Gross residential densities should be used for the following 
reasons : 

a. In order to plan for public facilities and services 
such as schools, sewers, fire protection, parks, roads, 
and drainage, the total number of persons living in an 
area must be known; while, the density of specific 
development sites is less significant. 

b. For any given area with the same gross residential 
density, the total number of dwelling units - which 
relates to population - would remain the same 
regardless of the type of development or the 
distibution of land uses in that area. Thus, gross 
residential density allows greater flexibility of 
housing types in each area. 

c. The concept of gross density encourages developers to 
allocate land for public facilities, such as schools, 
fire stations, roads, drainage and parks, without being 
penalized for reduction in total dwelling units. 

d. Gross residential density provides the developer with 
'incentives to reduce overall site and housing costs, as 
well as to provide for more innovative design than is 
possible under conventional (net density) development. 

e. Gross density encourages the protection of 
undevelopable conservation areas throu^ the transfer 
of dwelling units on the property. However ,• there may 
be instances where the resulting net density will be 
inappropriate for a given site. These proposals shall 
be reviewed on an individual case basis. (see 
Conservation Policy 8.3.2) 

1.2.2. The following classification of gross residential densities 
shall serve as a guideline for evaluating development in 
Alachua County. (DU/Acre = Dwelling Units per Acre) 

a. Urban Residential Densities - Areas designated for 
residential use and having more than 30 points under 
the residential density checklist shall be considered 
as urban residential areas. Development policies for 
these areas shall be according to the following 
categories: 

Low Density Up to 2.00 DU/Acre 

Low-Medium Density 2.01 to 4.00 DU/Acre 

Medium Density 4.01 to 8.00 DU/Acre 

Medium-Hi^ Density 8.01 to 14.00 DU/Acre 

High Density 14.01 to 24.00 DU/Acre 

b. Rural Residential Densities - Areas designated for 
residential use and having 30 or fewer points shall be 
considered as rural residential areas. Development 
policies for these areas are set forth in Section 7.0. 

16 



1.2.3. A range in urban residential densities should be provided 
with the hi^est densities located in or near urban activity 
centers, and lower densities located in outlying areas or 
areas of the County which have physical limitations to 
development as delineated in the Conservation Policies. 

1.2.4. Densities of new urban residential development should 
coincide with the capacity of the existing transportation 
system or the capacity of improvements as programmed in the 
adopted Alachua County Department of Public Works' Capital 
Improvements Program or the Metropolitan Transportation 
Planning Organization's Transportation Improvement Program 
(T.I. P.).* 

1.5. LOCATION AND COMPATIBILITY 

1.3.1. Future location and density of urban residential 
development should implement the Urban Cluster Concept. 

1.3.2. Residential development should preserve or create unified 
residential areas, free from the influence and encroachment 
of incompatible land uses. 

1.3.2.1. Residential areas should contain or have readily 
accessible all of the facilities, private or public, 
that are necessary for convenient, modern living. 

(a) As residential areas develop, sites for future 
public uses such as parks, schools, and open space 
areas should be obtained througji dedication or 
purchase . 

1.3.2.2. Urban residential areas should provide for sidewalks 
and/or bikeways, convenient access to individual 
dwelling units, churches, schools, parks, activity 
centers and other facilities. 

1.3.2.3. Residential areas should be designed to provide for an 
efficient system of internal circulation, including the 
provision of collector streets connecting the 
residential area to the major street system. 



^Capacity is calculated at level of service "D' 



17 



1.3.2.4. Buffering should be provided to lessen the impact and 
friction between residential and nonresidential land 
uses. Such buffering may take the form of: 

(a) physical barriers, such as hedges, landscaped 
screens, walls, fences, or open space separation 
left in its natural state; or 



Figure E 




(b) the placement of transitional uses along the edge 
of the residential and nonresidential land uses 
which would be more compatible to the uses on 
either side. 



Figure F 




18 



1.3 .3* In order to preclude detrimental noise impact on residential 
areas and to protect the public's investment in the 
G-ainesville Regional Airport, residential development should 
"be allowed only under certain conditions within the Noise 
Attenuation Area, and shall be excluded from the Noise 
Sensitive District, as designated by the land use plan 
maps. 

1 .3.4. The scale of residential care facilities should be in 
concert with the density and character of the surrounding 
residential area. (See definition page 122) 

1.3. 5. Concentrations of residential care facilities should be 
prohibited in order to maintain compatibility with the 
existing residential character of the nei^borhood. 

URBAN RESIDENTIAL DENSITIES 

1 .3.6. Low Density Up to 2.0 DU/Acre 

1.3.6.1. Low Density development should provide for single 
family developments and residential planned unit 
developments of mixed housing types up to 2.0 DU/per 
gross acre. 

1.3.6.2. Low Density residential development may include all the 
various housing types such as conventional single 
family structures, attached structures, dwellings with 
zero lot line orientation, factory built modular units 
or mobile home construction where compatible with 
surrounding development. (See definition page 113) 

1.3.7. Low-Medium Density 2.01 to 4.0 DU/Acre 

1.3.7.1. Low-Medium Density residential areas should be located 
in areas which are, or can be, economically and 
efficiently served by supporting community facilities, 
and services such as streets, utilities, and public 
protection. These areas shall be served by central 
water and sanitary sewer systems. 

1.3.7.2. Low-Medium Density development should allow for all the 
various housing types. (See 1 .3.6.2.) 

1 .3.8. Medium Density 4.01 to 8.0 DU/Acre 

1.3.8.1. Criteria for permitting multi-family development in 
this density shall include, but not limited to: 

(a) access along an arterial or collector; 

(b) buffering in the form of open space or planted 
areas to provide additional protection for 
adjacent properties; 

(c) provision of developed recreation. 

19 



-_-i< 



1.3.8.2. Medium Density development shall allow for all the 
various housing types. (See 1.3-6.2.) 

1.3.9. Medium High Density 8.01 to 14.0 DU/Acre 

1.3.9.1. Medium Hi^ Density development should be encouraged to 
provide recreation and open space throu^ the 
clustering of dwelling units. 

1.3.9.2. Medium High Density developments may include single 
family attached, multi-family and factory built modular 
housing. 

1.3.9.3. The criteria established in 1.3. 8.1 are applicable to 
Medium Hi^ Density development. 

1.3.10. High Density I4.OI to 24.00 DU/Acre 

1.3.10.1. Hi^ Density residential development should occur in or 
adjacent to the University of Florida activity center, 
and hi^ or medium activity centers to "reduce the 
length and number of automobile trips. 

1.3.10.2 Hi^ Density development should be located adjacent to 
arterials and transit lines, and shall have convenient 
pedestrian and bikeway access to activity centers. 
(See definition for Bikeways, Page 121). 

1.3.10.3 Higher Densities than determined by the Residential 
Density Checklist may be appropriate only within higji 
activity centers, provided that the development is 
compatible with surrounding land uses. 

1.3.10.4 The criteria established in 1.3. 8.1 are applicable to 
Higji Density development. 

1.4. DESIGN AND SITE STANDARDS 

1.4.1. The use of proven, innovative concepts for residential 
development such as planned unit developments are strongly 
encouraged . 

1.4.1.1. Appropriate mixes of housing types within planned unit 
developments should be allowed where such mixes will 
not be incompatible with the character of the 
surrounding residential area. 

1.4.1.2. Existing or planned supporting facilities and utilities 
shall be adequate to serve densities proposed within 
the planned unit development. 

1.4.1.3. Planned unit developments designed for phasing shall 
embody proper access, circulation, drainage, open space 
and utilities for each phase to ensure viability at all 
stages of development. 



20 



1.4.1.4. Those portions of planned unit developments which are 
adjacent to other residential areas should be or equal 
or lower intensity (i.e., size, scale, and character) 
than existing or proposed adjoining densities. 



incompatible intensity 




'compatible Intensity 



1.4.1.5. Any commercial uses to be included in residential 
planned unit developments shall be developed and 
designed to serve the residential units of the planned 
unit development only, and shall be located internally 
within the planned unit development. These 
developments should have a minimum of 500 residential 
dwelling units. 

1.4.1.6. Mixed use planned unit developments containing office 
and commercial uses at or above the level of 
nei^borhood shopping center (see Section 3-7) shall 
locate in urban activity centers (see Section 2.0). 
(see definition page 121) 

1.4.1.7. Amendments to approved planned unit developments should 
be consistent with the original purpose, intent, 
overall design, density, and integrity of the original 
development plan. 

1.4.2. Planned unit developments are strongly encouraged. They 
should achieve the following: 

a. the protection of the natural environment; 

b. the creation of usable open space and recreational 
facilities on the development site throu^ clustering 
of dwelling units; 



21 



c. hi^er net densities than may be allowed throu^ 
conventional zoning, and 

d. a sense of community. 

1.4.3. New development should include internal separation of 
pedestrian, bicycle and vehicular circulation. 

1 .4.4. The design layout of new developments should not result in 
landlocking adjacent properties, and shall bear a reasonable 
relationship to the actual on-site topography. 

1.5. REQUIRED FACILITIES 

1.5.1. The density of new urban residential development shall be a 
function of the level of public facilities primarily as 
defined by the Residential Density Checklist (See Table 2). 
These necessary public facilities shall include but are not 
limited to: 

a. adequate arterial and collector streets; 

b. primary and secondary schools; 

c. developed parks; 

d. police, fire and emergency medical service protection; 

e. potable water supply; 

f . sanitary sewer system; and 

g. ledestrian and bikeways. 

As an alternative, these facilities shall be programmed in 
the adopted capital improvement program(s) of Alachua 
County, various municipalities, Gainesville Regional 
Utilities or the Alachua County School Board. 



22 



Urban Activity Center 

Policies 




FUTURE 

UNO 

USE 



2f 



m 



2.0 UR B AN ACTiyiTY CENTER POLICIES 

2.1 . GENERAL 

Urban axitivity centers are nodes of hi^ intensity uses. In order 
to promote the goals and objectives of Future Land Use, it is the 
intent of these policies and standards to encourage the location of 
high intensity uses within urban activity centers. Most activity 
centers will be dominated by commercial uses. However, other 
ax^tivity centers will be characterized by institutional, 
industrial, or office uses as primary activities. The nature and 
intensity of secondary uses within activity centers shall be judged 
in li^t of the primary use and the character of the surrounding 
area. 

2.1.1. Urban activity center development shall be timed and 
staged with the economic and efficient provision of 
supporting community facilities such as streets, 
utilities, and police and fire protection. 

2.1.2. Development intensity within activity centers shall be 
greatest at the centroid, gradually decreasing towards 
the fringe to a point where it is compatible with 
surrounding land uses. 

2.1.3. Locations for future activity centers shall be determined 
by the level of future population within a specific 
service area. Wherever possible, sites should be 
confined to intersections of major hi^ways, and be of 
sufficient size to allow development of associated 
activities without encroaching on existing and future 
nei^borhoods. 

2.1.4. Urban activity centers are assigned a level of intensity 
based on the number of trips generated by the center as 
calculated from the tables in Appendix A. The level of 
each activity center shall be designated on the Future 
Land Use Map. (see 11.3.1.1). 

2.1.5" Activity centers supplying the same or similar needs 
should be spaced so that there are no overlapping 
service areas for the similar activities contained in the 
separate activity centers. The uses permitted and/or the 
level of retail commercial activity within an activity 
center may be limited in order to minimize the 
overlapping of service areas. 

2.2. HIGH ACTIVITY CENTER POLICIES AND STA N DARDS 

2.2.1. High activity centers are characterized by the 
concentration of all types of commercial uses. Regional 
Shopping Centers, offices, institutional or industrial 
activities normally serve as the primary use. 



25 



2.2.2. Other appropriate secondary activities are residential, 
office and institutional uses. 



2.3. MEDIUM ACTIVITY CENTER POLICIES AN D ST ANDARDS 

2.5.1. Medium activity centers are characterized by the concen- 
trations of all types of commercial uses. Community 
Shopping Centers, offices, institutional, or industrial 
activities normally serve as the primary use. 

2.5.2. Other appropriate secondary activities are residential, 
office and institutional uses. 



2.4. LOW ACTIVITY CENTER POLICIES AND S T ANDARDS 

2.4.1. Low activity centers are commonly characterized by the 
concentration of nei^borhood-oriented commercial uses. 
Nei^borhood Shopping Centers usually serve as the hub of 
these activity centers. However, office, 
institutional, or industrial activities may also serve as 
the primary use. 

2.4.2. Other appropriate secondary activities are residential, 
office and institutional uses. 



2.5. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ACTIVITY CENTER POLICIES AND S TA NDARDS 

2.5.1. The University of Florida activity center is charac- 
terized by the concentration of university-owned 
facilities. 

2.5.2. The intent of this activity center is to delineate the 
area dominated by the facilities of the University of 
Florida. This center will serve as a density generator 
for the Residential Density Checklist (see Table 2), and 
will not necessitate policies and standards for ar\y uses 
other than institutional. 

2.6. DESIGN AND SITE STANDARDS 

2.6.1. All uses within activity centers shall be designed to 
minimize the effects of lifting, noise and signing on 
residential areas. 



26 



Commercial 
Policies 




FUTURE 

UND 

USE 



4 



I 

i 






3.0 C0M4ERCIAL POLICIES 



3.1. GENERAL 



3.1.1. In order to provide sufficient flexibility to meet the 
needs of different types of commercial activities, a 
range of land areas and locations should be provided for 
commercial development. 

3.1.2. New commercial facilities shall be encouraged to locate 
on vacant parcels of land within designated activity 
centers in order to discourage strip commercial 
development and the premature establishment of new 
activity centers. 

a) All nei^borhood, community and regional level 
shopping centers shall locate within higji, medium, 
or low activity centers according to appropriate 
standards. 

3.1.3. The size, location, and function of shopping centers 
should be related and central to the population and 
market area they serve. 

3.1.4. Caumercial development shall be designed to minimize the 
negative impacts on surrounding residential uses. 

3.1.5. The sale of agricultural products produced on site shall 
be permissible on that site. 

3.1.6. New commercial developments should be designed to provide 
for the concentration of similar and/or complimentary 
commercial uses in order to promote a more efficient, 
viable and orderly use of land. 

3.1.7. Commercial locations and proposed uses shall be 
consistent with the Conservation Policies and Standards. 

.1.8. Shopping Centers are designated a level within the 
Regional, Community, Neighborhood hierarchy based on the 
characteristics of the leading tenant. 

3.1 .9. The County shall develop regulations that establish 
landscaping and signage standards for commercial 
development . 

3.1.10. All Nei^borhood, Community, and Regional shopping 
centers shall include bicycle parking areas, and when 
appropriate, bus bays and bus shelters in order to 
encourage alternative transportation modes. 




29 



3.2. LOCATION AND COMPATIBILITY 

3.2.1. Trips generated as a result of new commercial development 
should coincide with the capacity of existing 
transportation facilities or facilities programmed in the 
adopted Alachua County Department of Public Works Capital 
Improvements Program and the Metropolitan Transportation 
Planning Organizations 's Transportation Improvement 
Program (T.I. P.) 

3.3. REQUIRED FACILITIES AND SERVICES 

3.3.1. New commercial development within urban clusters should 
have adequate public facilities and services which 
include, but are not limited to: 

a) fire service 

b) water supply 

c) pedestrian facilities (in urban clusters) 

d) street lighting 

e) solid waste collection and disposal 

f ) sewage collection and disposal 

g) stormwater drainage and disposal 
h) emergency medical service 



3.4. ROADWAY COMMERCIAL POLICIES AND STAtJDARDS 

Roadway commercial or "strip commercial" development should be 
located within activity centers. These uses are generally 
undesirable because of increased traffic problems, decreased visual 
quality and the creation of more commercial/residential 
interfacing. However, certain commercial uses may not be 
compatible with activity center development but are more 
appropriate along arterial streets. 



30 



3.4.1. Location and Compatibility 

3.4.1.1. New Roadway Commercial uses shall only be permitted 
to infill existing "strips" rather than extending or 
opening up new "strips". 



Figure H 


Inffnl 




at non ^ 




^1 


1 



Eitanilon 



Infill 



<> 

m p 


1 1 1 


ja 


1 



Exiantien 

3.4.1.2. Roadway commercial uses shall have frontage on or 
direct access from arterials. 

3.4.1.3. Roadway commercial uses are appropriate only within 
the designated urban clusters. 

3.4.1.4. Office uses may be permitted to infill existing 
roadway commercial areas when appropriate office 
standards are met (see 3.9.1.). 

3.4.2. Development Regulations 

3.4.2.1. Roadway commercial uses shall be implemented with 
development regulations which address the unique 
needs of this land use classification. 

3.5. RB5I0NAL SHOPPING CENTER POLICIES AND STANDARDS 

The general characteristics of Regional Shopping Centers are 
described by the following standards: 



Usual Minimum Site Area 
Gross Leaseable Area (GLA) 
Minimum Support Required 
Market Area Radius 
Number of Stores 
Leading Tenant 



Other Tenants 



30-50 acres or more 

300,000-1 ,000,000 sq ft or more 

150,000 or more people 

10-1 5 miles or more 

40 or more 

1 or more full-line department 

stores of at least 100,000 sq ft 

GLA 

Stores providing such items as: 

General merchandise, furniture, 

and home furnishings. 



31 



3.5.1. Location and Compatibility 

3.5 •! •! • Regional Shopping Centers shall be located at the: 

a) intersections of arterials; or 

b) interchanges of arterials and interstate 
hi^ways. 

Figure I 




Regional Shopping Center 



3.5.1 .2 . Regional Shopping Centers and any planned expansion 
shall be developed on one contiguous site without 
being separated by public streets or highways. 

3.5*1 '3. Regional Shopping Centers should be served by mass 

transportation routes and shall be designed to 
accomodate mass transit vehicles. 

3.5.2. Design and Sj.te Standards 

3.5.2.1. Points of ingress /egress shall be designed to 
minimize traffic hazards and decreases in highway 
capacity. 

3.5.2.2. Regional Shopping Centers should be designed using 
the pedestrian mall concept. 

3.5.2.3. Adequate parking shall be provided and arranged to 
facilitate ingress/egress and pedestrian movement. 

3.5.3. Development Regulations 

3.5.3.1. Development regulations implementing the Regional 
Shopping Center classification shall be prepared. 



32 



3.6. COMMUNITY SHOPPING CENTER POLICIES AND STANDARDS 

The general characteristics of Camnunity Shopping Centers are 
described by the following standards: 



Usual Minimum Site Area 
Gross Leasable Area (GLA) 
Minimum Support Required 
Market Area Radius 
Number of Stores 
Leading Tenant 



10 acres 

100,000 to 300,000 square feet 

20,000 to 60,000 people 

2 miles or more 

15 to 40 

Variety, discount, or junior 

department store 

A sui)ermarket and drugstore 



Other Tenants 

3.6.1. Location and Compatibility 

3.6.1.1. Conmunity Shopping Centers shall be located at the: 

a. intersection of arterials, or 

b. intersection of collectors and arterials 
Figure J 




Community Shopping Center 

3.6.2. Design and Site Standards 

3.6.2.1. Adequate parking for all vehicles shall be provided 
and arranged to facilitate ingress and egress and 
pedestrian movement. 

3.6.2.2. Community Shopping Centers shall be designed so as 

to minimize their impacts on adjacent and nearby 
residential areas. 

3.6.2.3. Points of ingress and egress shall be designed to 
minimize traffic hazards and decreases in highway 
capacity. 

3.6.2.4. In addition to being served by mass transportation, 
Community Shopping Centers shall have safe access 
for pedestrians and bicyclists. 



33 



3.6.3. Development Regulations 

3.6.3.1. Development regulations shall 
implement the Community 
classification. 



be devised to 
Shopping Center 



3.7. NEIGHBORHOOD SHOPPING CENTER POLICIES AND STANDARDS 



The general characteristics of nei^borhood 
represented by the following standards: 



shopping centers are 



Usual Minimum Site Area 
Gross Leasable Area (GLA) 
Minimum Support Required 
Radius of Market Area 
Number of Stores 
Leading Tenant 
Other Tenants 



4 acres 

30,000 to 100,000 sq feet 
5,000 to 10,000 people 
1— J miles or more 

5 to 20 
Supermarket 

Stores providing convenience 
goods and personal services for 
the day-to-day needs of the 
immediate neighborhood. 



3.7.1. Location and Ccmpatibility 

3.7.1.1. Nei^borhood Shopping Centers shall locate: 



a. 



at the intersection of arterials or arterials 
and collectors, and 

Figuro K 




b. 



Neighborhood Shopping Center 

to prohibit having local neighborhood streets 
as their principle traffic access. 



3.7.2. Design and Site Standards 

3.7.2.1. Adequate buffering shall be provided along roadways 
and along adjacent uses particularly to minimize the 
effects of lifting, noise, and signing on 
residential areas. 

3.7.2.2. Points of ingress and egress shall be designed to 
minimize traffic hazards and decreases in highway 
capacity. 



34 



3.7.2.3. Neigjiborhood Shopping Centers shall be designed so 
as to minimize their impacts on adjacent and nearby 
residential areas. 

3.7.2.4. Adequate parking for all vehicles shall be provided 
and arranged to facilitate ingress and egress and 
pedestrian movement. 

3.7.2.5. Neigjiborhood Shopping Centers shall have safe access 
for pedestrians and bicyclists. 

3.8. NEIGHBDRHOOD CONVENIENCE C0MP4ERCIAL POLICIES AND STANDARDS 



The general characteristics of Nei^borhood 
represented by the following standards: 



Convenience Centers are 



Usual Maximum Site Area 
Gross Leasable Area (GLA) 
Spacing 



Leading Tenant 
Other Tenants 
Canpatible Adjacent Uses 

3.8.1. Location and Compatibility 



1 Acre 

3,000 to 10,000 square feet 

At least 1 mile travelling 

distance on public roads 

from facilities supplying 

the same needs or another 

Neighborhood 

Center. 

Nei^borhood 

Store 

Laundry, Dry 

Eating places. 

Residential 

business and 



Convenience 



Convenience 



Cleaning, 



development , 
industrial, 



open space and apiculture. 



3.8.1.1. Nei^borhood Convenience Centers shall be located on 
major collector or arterial streets, with preference 
given to locations at the intersections of such 
streets. 

3.8.1.2. New Convenience Centers shall not be located 
internally within existing single family neigjibor- 
hoods unless integrated with a planned unit 
development . 

3.8.1.3. Convenience centers are appropriate only within 
Urban Clusters, Rural Activity Centers, Rural 
Employment Centers, and Rural Clusters. 

3.8.2. Design and Site Standards 

3.8.2.1. Adequate parking for all vehicles shall be provided 
ahd arranged to facilitate ingress and egress and 
pedestrian movement. 

3.8.2.2. Points of ingress and egress shall be designed to 
minimize traffic hazards and decreases in highway 
capacity. 



35 



3.8.2.3. Adequate buffering shall be provided along roadways 
and along adjacent uses particularly to minimize the 
effects of lifting, noise, and signing on resi- 
dential areas. 

3.9. OFFICE POLICIES AND STANDAR3)S 

Individual offices or office parks provide for professional and 
business services exclusive of retail trade. Office uses are 
unique because of the need to have accessibility to both 
residential and other commercial uses. Their special trade area 
characteristics require office uses to have additional policies and 
standards. 

3.9.1. Location and Ccxppatibility 

3.9.1.1. Office Uses should be restricted to Activity 
Centers, Tourist /Entertainment Centers, Rural 
Activity Centers or Rural Bnplojnnent Centers. 
However, these uses may be allowed to infill within 
existing roadway commercial areas or where 
demonstrated unique and special problems of 
compatibility of adjacent uses indicate that offices 
are appropriate. Offices may be permitted in PUD's 
provided the appropriate standards are met. (see 
Policy 1.4, Page 20) 

3.9.1.2. Office uses may be located within existing roadway 
commercial areas, but should not extend or lengthen 
such areas such except as a method of providing a 
rapid transition between roadway commercial uses and 
nearby single family residential uses. 

3.9.1.3. The disruption of residential areas by poorly 
located office activities shall be prohibited. 

3.9.1.4. Office uses are appropriate in areas planned for 
hi^ density residential use along major arterials 
served by public mass transportation. 

3.10. TOURIST/ENTERTAINMENT COMMERCIAL POLICIES AND STANDARDS 

Tourist/entertainment commercial uses are oriented primarily 
toward providing services for the short term visitor to Alachua 
County. These commonly include gasoline stations, restaurants, 
lodging, and special entertainment facilities. 

3.10.1. Location and Conpatibility 

3.10.1.1. These uses are most appropriate, but are not limited 
to, highway interchanges with Interstate 75. 



36 



3.10.1.2. Tourist /entertainment uses should have direct access 
from arterials with preference given to 
intersections. In specific instances it may be 
appropriate for certain uses to locate away from 
arterials due to the desire to locate that 
individual use adjacent to the natural environment. 
(For example, restaurants, marine business uses and 
campground/travel trailer parks.) 

3.10.2. Development Regulations 

3.10.2.1. Development regulations to implement the 
Tourist /Entertainment commercial uses shall be 
adopted . 

3.11. RURAL COMMERCIAL USES 

Canmercial uses in rural areas should be concentrated within defined 
rural clusters, rural employment centers and rural activity centers. 
Standards are provided in Section 7.0. 



37 



Industrial 
Policies 




FUTURE 

LtND 

USE 



\2 
4 



i 



n 

I 



4.0. INDUSTRIAL POLICIES 

4.1 . GENEE^AL 

Industrial developments are characterized by the fabrication, 
manufacturing, transporting, warehousing or distribution of goods. 

4.1.1. Industrial development shall be consistent with the urban 
cluster concept. 

4.1.1.1. Industrial development, in addition to agriculturally 
oriented or extractive operations, can occur outside 
the urban cluster provided that the location is 
determined by evaluating the expected benefit to the 
economy of the area, as compared to the additional 
costs in the provision of public services, the impact 
on the environment, impact on surrounding residential 
areas, and other policies in the Comprehensive Plan. 
These Industrial uses should be isolated in the rural 
area. 

4.1.1.2. Industrial uses, other than agriculturally oriented or 
extractive operations, located outside of urban 
clusters should locate in defined rural employment 
centers. Standards for rural employment centers are 
contained in Section 7.0. 

4.1.2. A range of choice in land areas and locations for the 
different types of industry shall be provided to meet the 
anticipated expansion of industry in the County. 

4.1.3. Industrial locations and proposed uses shall be consistent 
with the Conservation Policies of Alachua County. 

4.1.3.1. Industrial operations shall minimize or, where 
possible, eliminate the following impacts on the 
environment: 

a) erosion 

b) noise 

c) odor, fumes, vapors and gases 

d) fire and explosion hazards 

e) radioactive elements 

f) electromagnetic interference 

g) smoke, dust and dirt 
h) vibrations 

i ) glare 

j) toxic wastes 



- 


4.2. LOCATION AND COMPATIBILITY 






4.2.1. Industrial uses should not be located 
residential areas without adequate buffering. 


adjacent 


to 


' 


41 







4.2.2. Prime industrial locations along arterials, expressways, 
rail lines and near cargo airport terminals should be free 
from encroachment of incompatible land uses. 

4.2 .3 • Commercial uses within an industrial area shall be limited 
to nei^borhood convenience, intended to serve industrial 
parks, and warehouse retail. 

4.3. DESIGN AND SITE STANDARDS 

4.3.1. Industrial facilities in urban clusters should group 
together in planned industrial districts on sites capable of 
being expanded and developed in stages. Criteria for 
permitting industrial development shall include but are not 
limited to: 

a. topography and soils — land having stable, well-drained 
soils, free from flooding; 

b. climate — prevailing wind direction that does not impact 
adjacent residential areas; 

c. accessibility — access to arterials and hi^ways and, 
where possible, rail facilities; 

d. utilities — availability of water, sewer, electricity or 
natural gas in adequate quantities; 

e. size — large enou^ for proper site design. 

4.3.2. Industrial sites shall be designed to provide for: 

a. adequate off-street parking to meet the needs of the 
operation; and 

b. adequate buffering along roadways and adjacent uses to 
minimize the effects of lighting, noise and signing. 

4.3.3. When development is located along a railway facility or a 
railroad-highway intersection, conflicts between the 
development and the adjacent hi^way network should be 
avoided. 

4.4. REQUIRED FACILITIES AND SERVICES 

4.4.1. Industrial development shall be located only in areas where 
adequate facilities and services exist or will be provided 
prior to occupancy. These facilities include, but are not 
limited to: 

a) roadways 

b) fire service 

c) water supply 



42 



d) street lifting 

e) solid waste collection and disposal 

f) sewage collection and disposal 

g) storm water drainage and disposal 

h) emergency medical service 

4.4.2. Industrial development shall coincide with the capacity of 
the existing transportation system or not exceed the 
capacity of the programmed improvements by the Department of 
Public Works or the Metropolitan Transportation Planning 
Organization's Transportation Improvement Program. 



43 



Institutional 
Policies 







FUTURE 

ItND 

USE 



3.0 INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES 

5.1. (tENEE^AL 

Potential locations for future institutional uses are not identified 
on the Land Use Element Maps. Location is determined by the nature of 
the individual uses as defined in Section 5.2. 

5.1.1. The following uses are considered institutional and 
governmental uses in Alachua County: 

a. Public and Private Educational Facilities (meeting 
State of Florida compulsory education requirements), 
Day Care Centers, and Nursery Schools; 

b. Cultural Facilities (for example: libraries, museums, 
theaters for performing arts); 

c. Health Care Facilities (hospitals, specialized medical 
centers, clinics, nursing homes, retirement centers); 

d. Public utility and other infrastructure facilities; 

e. Religious Facilities; and 

f. Ccxmunity Service Organizations. 

5.1.2. Major institutional development shall implement the urban 
cluster concept. 

5.1.3. Locations for institutional uses shall conform with the 
Conservation policies of Alachua County. 

5.2. LOCATION AND COMPATIBILITY 

5.2.1. The following criteria shall determine the appropriateness 
of potential institutional locations: 

a. Optimum service area; 

b. Optimum operating size; 
0. Access to clientele; 

d. Compatibility with surrounding uses; 

e. Nature of service provision; and 

f. Needs of the clientele. 

5.2.2. Institutional facilities shall not be located where they 
would have an adverse impact on surrounding land uses. 



47 



5.3. EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 

5.3.1 • The following areas should be avoided vhen locating future 
educational facilities in Alachua County: 

a. Noise Attenuation Area or Noise Sensitive District; 

b. Environmentally sensitive areas as determined in 
accordance with the conservation policies of Alachua 
Coimty (see Sec. 8.0. ); 

c. Existing or designated hi^ or medium activity centers 
(excluding day care centers and nursery schools); 

d. Existing or designated industrial districts; and 

e. Any area where the nature of existing or proposed 
adjacent land uses would endanger the safety of 
students or decrease the effective provision of 
education. 

5.3.2. Elementary schools should be located near: 

a. existing or proposed residential areas; and 

b. existing or designated parks and recreational areas to 
facilitate the joint use of these areas. 

5.3.3. To ensure the safety of children, elementary schools should 
be located on local or collector streets. 

5.3*4. To ensure accessibility, junior and senior hig)i schools 
should be located near arterial streets. 

5.3.5. To ensure safety and accessibility, all schools should be 
linked with residential areas by bikeways and sidewalks. 

5.4. LIBRARIES 

5.4.1 . To ensure accessibility, future branch libraries should be 
located in activity centers. 

5.4.2. Libraries shall not be located in the Noise Sensitive 
District of Noise Attenuation Area. 

5.5. FIRE PROTECTION 

5.5.1. Fire stations should be located so as to provide the most 
cost effective, efficient protection of life and property. 

5.5.2. Fire stations should be located on arterial streets or 
streets that connect to arterials and that have sufficient 
width for turning movements. 

5.5.3. Fire stations should be located on those streets that have 
sufficient width for turning movements, and that connect to 
arterial streets. 

48 



5.6. LAV ENTORCEMENT 

5.6.1. Law enforcement facilities should be located near the center 
of the area to be serviced with access to major streets. 

5.7. aiERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE 

5.7.1. Emergency Medical Service (MS) facilities should be located 
near the center of the area to be serviced with access to 
major streets. 

5.8. HEALTH FACILITIES 

5.8.1. Major health facilities should be accessible by mass 
transit. 

5.8.2. Medical support facilities and services should locate in 
close proximity to hospitals. 

5.9. PUBLIC SERVICES 

5.9*1 • Public utilities should be located in common corridors to 
reduce land costs and to minimize the impacts of exposing 
new land to such uses. 

5.9.2. Sanitary landfills, solid waste transfer stations, and 
regional sewa^ treatment plants should be adequately 
buffered from residential neigjiborhoods. 

5.9'3« Locations for public utilities shall conform with the 
conservation policies of Alachua County. 

5.9«4. Landfills and transfer systems should be designed to have a 
minimal impact on the environment. 

5.9.5« Corrections facilities shall be located away from 
residential neighborhoods. 

5.10. COMMUNITY SERVICE ORCANIZATIQNS 

5.10.1. Canmunity Service Organizations should be considered as 
institutional uses. Special provisions shall be made in the 
development regulations to address the unique needs of those 
uses. 



49 



Recreation and 

Open Space 

Policies 



i 



c 




FOrURE 

MND 

USE 



S 
4 



V 



^ 



6.0. RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE POLICIES 



6.1 . GENERAL 

6.1.1. Natural barriers, such as steeply sloping ridges, sinkhole 
areas, stream flood plains, and other areas unsuitable for 
urban development, shall be used where appropriate as 
natural dividers between neighborhoods, and should be 
retained as recreation or open space areas. 

6.1.2. Urban separators, in the form of open space or greenbelts, 
shall be established between municipal urban areas in the 
County, in order to prevent the merging of urban areas, and 
their consequent loss of identity. 

6.1.5. Recreational and open space land uses should implement the 
urban cluster concept. However, potential sites outside 
urban clusters are acceptable where th^ would provide 
access to the unique natural environment. 

6.2. LOCATION AND COMPATIBILITY 

6.2.1. Recreational development and open space areas should be 
encouraged to coincide with the protection of aquifer 
recharge areas. 

6.2.2. Recreational and open space areas should be utilized to 
separate incompatible land uses. 

6.2.3. The future location of neighborhood parks should be 
coordinated with the Alachua County School Board and various 
municipal governments to minimize total land costs, share 
maintenance costs, and to enhance the sense of community 
with a combined site. 

6.2.4. Nei^borhood and community parks should be located on local 
and collector streets. However, such facilities may locate 
adjacent to arterials, railroad tracks, power lines or other 
facilities, provided that proper screening and public safety 
is assured. 

6.2.5. The public use of Alachua County's recreational water 
resources should be encouraged. Measures should be taken to 
provide proper access to these resources. 

6.3. DESIGN AND SITE STANDARDS 

6.3.1. Recreational and open space areas should be linked to 
residential areas by bikepaths, sidewalks or footpaths. 

6.3.2. Recreational and open space areas should be designed to 
minimize the impacts of people on the sensitive natural 
environment. 

6.3.3. Donated park sites shall allow for access by the general 
public. 

53 



Rural 
Policies 




FUTURE 

lAHD 

USE 



4 



7.0 RURAL POLICIES 

7.1. GENERAL 

Rural areas should be developed in a manner consistent with the 
retention of agriculture and the preservation of environmentally 
sensitive areas. Rural areas also act as urban separators. Strict 
limitation of development in rural areas contributes to the efficient 
growth and operation of public services and facilities, thus ensuring 
the most effective use of public resources. Limitations on 
development in rural areas also ensures the availability of land 
appropriate for the future growth of the community. 

7.2. AGRICULTURE 

7.2.1. The County shall encourage the continuation of productive 
agricultural uses, as they are very important to the local 
economy. 

7.2.2. Urban growth should be encouraged away from important 
agricultural areas so long as other opportunities for growth 
exist in the County. 

7.2.3. Sound conservation practices and increased production 
should be encouraged in the use of agricultural lands, 
including multiple use forestry practices consistent with 
resource tolerance, (see 8.3.1(d)) 

7.2.4. The County should support the development of markets for 
the sale of locally produced agricultural goods. Support 
should be, reflected in the County's economic development 
policies. 

7.2.5. Agricultural pursuits shall be allowed in all land use 
classifications, provided that the health, safety and 
welfare of the general public is assured. 

7.3. RURAL ACTIVITY CENTERS 

7.3.1. Rural activity centers are characterized by a concentraiton 
of permanent population exceeding 1 ,000 persons within an 
incorporated area and its immediate fringe. These centers 
lack the major concentrations of intense development found 
in urban activity centers. 

7.3.1.1. Rural activity centers are not considered density 
generators for the application of the point system. 
Public facilities located within the rural activity 
center would, however, generate points within j mile 
from the corporate limits of the center. 

7.3.1.2. Non-residential development should be permitted within 
rural activity centers provided that appropriate 
policies and standards are met. 

57 



^ 



7.3.1.3. Existing rural activity centers are the tcwns of Newberry, 
Archer, and V7aldo including the urban fringe with \ mile. 

7.3.2. Public protection, parks, and central water and sever should be 
encouraged to serve the entire rural activity center. 



7. 4. RURAL EMPLOYMEm' CENTEEIS 

Rural enploynent centers are characterized by at least one enployer of 100 
or more persons outside of an urban cluster. These centers may also 
contain supporting coimercial or industrial activities and a concentration 
of residential development. 

7.4.1. Rural errplcyment centers are not considered density generators 
for application of the point system. 

7.4.2. Residential development in a rural errroloyment center may be 
permitted with lot sizes of 1 acre or greater (or \ acre with a 
central water system) . 

7.4.3. Supporting activities may be permitted within a rural enploymsnt 
center provided that the appropriate policies and standards 
within the Cortprehensive Plan are met. 

7.4.4. The following existing rural errployment centers have been 
identified: (a) Jonesville, (b) Research and Development carrpus, 
(c) General Electric at Hague, (d) Car Ion Conpany, (e) Dritech, 
Inc. and (f ) Frari]<lin Crate, Inc. 

7.4.5. Future rural erployment centers have been identified at the IBM 
prcperty and Hague. 



7. 5. RURAL CLUSTERS 

7.5.1. Rural clusters are characterized by a concentration of permanent 
peculation of less than 1,000 persons outside of an urban 
cluster. These clusters serve as a focus for the rural ccmrunity 
and generally contain lots of less than 5 acres and retail 
ccannercial at a level to serve the immediate peculation. 

7.5.1.1. Rural clusters are not considered density generators for the 
application of the point system. 

7.5.1.2. Residential development in the rural clusters may be 
permitted on one acre or larger lots (or \ acre or larger if 
central water is available). 

7.5.1.3. Rural clusters generally should be no larger than \ mile 
radius from the focal point. 



58 



7.5.1 .4. Non-residential development may be permitted within a 
rural cluster provided that appropriate policies and 
standards are met. 

7.5.1.5. The following communities are considered rural 
clusters: (a) LaCrosse, (b) Micanopy, (c) Cross Creek, 
(d) Evinston, (e) Campville, (f) Grove Park, 
(g) Rochelle, (h) Windsor, (i) Lochloosa, (3) Island 
drove, (k) Orange Heigjits, (l) Melrose, (m) Earlton, 
(n) Fairbanks, (o) Hague, (p) Santa Pe, and 
(r) Jonesville. 

7.6. RURAL RESIDENTIAL 

Areas outside of urban clusters, rural clusters, rural employment 
centers, and rural activity centers should be limited to agricultural 
and forestry activities, to other activities specifically enumerated 
for such areas in this Plan, and to residential uses. Residential 
development shall be permitted on one acre or larger lots. 

7.6.1. The County shall not construct new roadways other than 
arterials and collectors in the Fhiral Residential District 
at public expense, except those roadways designated in the 
state primary and secondary road system. The County shall 
assume operation and maintenance responsibilities only on 
roadways dedicated to, and meeting the standards of, the 
County or as adopted in the Transportation Element of 
Alachua County. Notwithstanding this policy, improvements 
such as paving, drainage, and realignment may be made in 
existing rural residential clusters provided that such 
improvements do not substantially expand the size of the 
residential area. Safety improvements shall be appropriate 
in any area of the County. 

7.6.2. Central Water and Sanitary Sewer lines shall not be 
extended into areas designated Rural Residential, unless the 
absence of such facilities would result in a threat to the 
public health or safety or as provided in the adopted 
potable water and sanitary sewer elements. 



59 



Conservation 
Policies 






FUTURE 

MND 

USE 



y 
I 

! 
I 



8.0. CONSERVATION POLICIES 

8.1 . GENERAL 

8.1.1. Areas that have natural limitations to development because of 
their sensitive environmental character shall be developed 
only within the constraints of those natural limitations. 

8.1.2. Land is deemed to be a conservation area if it possesses 
one or more of the following characteristics: 

a. Topography - Sinkholes, lakes, rivers, and streams. 

b. Vegetation - Areas containing the following wetland 
communities: 

1 . fresh water marsh; 

2. wet prairies; 

3. cypress domes and slou^s; and 

4. wetland hardwoods swamps. 

c. Flood Hazard - Areas subject to 100 year flooding. 

d. Wildlife Management Areas. 

e. Soils - Areas containing hydric soils (Hydric -soils 
contain muck, peat, are saturated fron 2 to 12 months 
of the year 7 out of 10 years, and have been determined 
by the Soil Conservation Service to be unsuitable for 
development ) . 

8.1.2.1. The intensity of development on land adjacent to 
conservation areas shall be determined in light of the 
unique characteristics of the conservation area. 

8. 1.3. The removal of vegetation and trees from shores of lakes, 
rivers, streams, and edges of wetland areas shall be 
discouraged in order to prevent erosion, except as needed 
for permitted recreation access and service facilities. 

8.1.4. Land reclamation measures and sound conservation practices 
shall be required on lands used for the extraction of 
natural resources. 

8.1.5. Where applicable, all development shall conform with the 
air and water quality standards as provided in the 
regulations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 
Water Management Districts, the Florida Department of 
Environmental Regulation, and other appropriate agencies. 



63 



J 



8.1.6. The significance of topography, vegetation, flood hazard, 
the 100 year flood area, and soils for a particular site 
will be determined during the development review process. 
Those areas that are not of significance to the conservation 
objectives of the County may be developed in accordance with 
County development regulations. 

8.1.7. Soil containing very severe, severe or moderate limitations 
to development as defined by the Soil Conservation Service 
shall be developed in such a manner as to miti^te those 
conditions. 

8.1.8. The habitats of endangered flora and fauna shall be 
protected from the encroachment of development. 

8.1 .9. Significant archeological sites shall be identified and 
protected from destruction. 

8.1.10. In general, the channelization of streams shall be 
discouraged. However, in cases when public safety is a 
concern, limited channelization may be permitted. 

8.2. LOCATION AND COMPATIBILITY 

8.2.1. Development occurring along the edges of conservation areas 
shall be designed to protect and minimize the impact of 
development on conservation areas. 

8.2.2. The environmental functions performed by wetland and 
Floridan aquifer recharge areas shall be considered in all 
phases of land development occurring in or around such 
areas. 

8.2 .3 • Development shall not occur immediately adjacent to the 
shores of lakes, rivers, streams, and edges of wetland areas 
except as permitted in Section 8.3. 

8.3. PERMITTED USES 

8.3.1 • The following uses will be permitted in Conservation areas: 

a. Public and private recreation and open space uses that 
do not significantly alter natural systems. (Recreation 
facilities providing neighborhood or community level 
services shall not be developed on land containing 
land containing hydric soils. See 11.5.2.); 

b. Public and private wildlife preserves, ^me management 
and refuge areas; 

c. Water conservation and retention areas which may be a 
portion of the overall site design (not all 
conservation areas are suitable for retention); 



64 



d. Agricultural uses that do not significantly alter the 
natural function of the designated areas; 

e. One single family residence on a minimum of five 
acres, provided that health and safety factors are suffi- 
ciently addressed. 

8.3.2. Land deemed to be a conservation area within a proposed 
development shall not be assigned a density based on the 
Residential Density Checklist. The allowable density within 
conservation areas shall be one dwelling unit on a minimum 
of five acres (see 8.3.1e above). However, the protection of 
conservation areas should be encouraged throu^ the transfer 
of density from conservation areas at a rate of one dwelling 
unit for each 2.5 acres. Such transfer of density may be to 
contiguous property under the same ownership or control and 
may be accomplished throu^ PUD zoning provisions. 

8.4. DESIGN AND SITE STAITDARDS 

8.4.1. Where residential development is permitted, the following 
conservation policies shall apply: 

a. All site alterations shall be confined to the area 
with the least environmental constraints; 

b. The proposed site plan shall incorporate existing 
vegetation to the greatest extent possible; and 

c. Runoff shall be detained on the upland portion of the 
site to the maximum extent possible. 

8.4.2. Structures built within a 100-year flood prone area shall be 
constructed in such a manner as to minimize the potential 
for flood damage to the structure, supporting facilities, 
and adjacent property. 

8.4.3 • The County shall encourage energy conservation throu^ the 
site Dlan review process of the Development Review Committee 
(DRC)l 

8.4.4. Septic tanks and drainfields shall be sited in a manner to 
protect conservation areas from the discharge of improperly 
treated effluent. 

8.5. DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS 

8.5.1 • The County will develop regulations that recognize the need 
to preserve the environmental integrity of conservation 
areas while encouraging the clustering of development on the 
buildable upland portion of parcels. 

8.5.2. The County will develop regulations that create incentives 
for the reduction of non-renewable energy usage. 



65 



II 
I 
I 

t 



Airport Impact 
Policies 



(~D 



V 



:^ 



FUTURE 

lAHD 

USE 



9.0 AIRPORT IMPACT POLICIES 



9.1 . GENERAL 



9.1.1. Land uses in the areas impacted by airport noise shall be 
designed to protect development from the hi^ ambient noise 
levels created by aircraft approaching an airport. 

9.2. DEVELOPMENT POLICIES 

9.2.1. Canmercial and industrial uses involving concentrations of 
people and residential development in the "overflight" area 
of the Gainesville Regional Airport, defined as an area 
3000' beyond each end of the runway and 500' either side of 
the centerline of the runway extended shall be prohibited. 

9.2.2. Development in the Ldn 75 and over area shall be limited 
consistent with Table 2 in PAR part 150, subject to the 
further limitations in the overflight area. 

9.2.3. Residential development shall be permitted in the Ldn 70-75 
area on a case by case basis and after a site analysis, with 
the requirement or a 30 dB outside to inside noise level 
reduction, provision of aviation easements in areas under 
the approach surface and provision of notice to prospective 
owners, all subject to the limitations in the overflight 
area. 

9.2.4. Resdiential development shall be generally permitted in the 
Ldn 65-70 area subject to the requirements of 24 CFR 51 and 
further subject to the limitations in the overfli^t area. 

9.2.5. Development shall be i)ermitted within areas below Ldn 65. 



69 



New Community 
Policies 





FUTURE 

MND 

USE 



R 



10.0. NEW COMMUNITY POLICIES 

10.1. GENEE^AL 

It is the intent of the Alachua County Comprehensive Plan to maintain 
its highest priority of encouraging the development and redevelopment 
of existing communities and their existing infrastructure over that of 
establishing new communities. The impact of new communities on 
existing communities should be fully and carefully evaluated using the 
policies and standards below. 

10.1.1. New Communities shall be large enou^ to support complex 
service systems and maintain balance, by consciously setting 
aside land for industrial, commercial, public, recreational, 
and institutional functions that are appropriate for the 
expected population. 

10.1.2. In order to promote a well-balanced community, the 
development plan shall be in conformance with the goals, 
objectives, policies and standards set forth in the 
Comprehensive Plan 

10.1.3. Regional and local impacts shall be clearly identified and 
their problem resolutions specified prior to any development 
plan approval. 

10.1 .4. New Cconnunities shall comply with the provisions of Chapter 
380 of the Florida Statutes. 



10. 2. DENSITY 

10.2.1. The minimum target population for a New Community should be 
20,000. 

10.2.2. The proposed distribution of residential densities for New 
Communities shall conform to the provisions established in 
the Residential Density Checklist (see Table 2.) 

10.3. LOCATION AND COMPATIBILITY 

10.3.1. New Communities should be encouraged in areas of the County 
where they will produce maximum public benefits as 
determined by a comprehensive planning process that is 
supported by sound, properly analyzed data and which 
incorporates adequate public participation. As such. New 
Communities will be idientified on the Land Use Plan map 
only after approval by the Board of County Commissioners. 
Once approved. New Communities will be identified as an 
Urban Cluster. 



73 



10.4. DESIGN AND SITE STANDARDS 

10.4.1. Applications for New Communities shall include an overall 
conceptual plan and a comprehensive phasing plan for the 
entire area at the time of initial application. 
Infrastructure plans must be submitted for the entire 
development. Detailed final site plans and accompanying 
information will be required for all phases to be 
constructed with a five year period from time of 
application. 

10.4.2. Issues of environmental sensitivity shall be dealt with in 
accordance with the conservation policies of Alachua 
County. In addition, the developer shall be responsible for 
the monitoring of impact on natural systems. 

10.5. REQUIRED FACILITIES 

10.5.1 • An implementation plan for the coordination of infra- 
structure - timing, sizing and location - shall be adopted 
by the Board of County Connnissioners prior to undertaking 
development . 

10.5.2. The costs of "public capital" shall be borne by the 
development organization. Escrow accounts or bonding should 
be required for new communities to assure that the public 
facilities are in fact put in place. Operation and 
maintenance costs shall be the responsibility of the New 
Community vis-a-vis an appropriate utility district and/or 
local government structure, with the cooperation of the 
developer . 

10.5 •3' New Communities shall be developed on an orderly basiswith 
public land designations made before lot sales occur. 

10.5 •4. All on-site and off -site impacts must be determined before a 
development order can be granted by Alachua County. The 
developer shall be responsible for the mitigation of all 
impacts. 

10.5 •5' The developer shall provide Alachua County with detailed 
plans concerning the system of governance responsible for 
the New Community. 

10.5.6. The developer shall provide target dates for all facility 
operations. 

10.5.7. All proposed impacts on the Alachua County Public School 
System shall be identified and mitigated with the approval 
of the Alachua County School Board. 

10.5.8. All recreation and open space facilities shall meet the 
standards established in the Recreation and Open Space 
Elements of the Comprehensive Plan. 



74 



Implementation 





FUTURE 

lAHD 

USE 



2 
i 



L 



11.0 IMPLEMENTATION 



11 .1 . GENEE^AL 

■ • 

The Ccanprehensive Plan, and the various elements thereof, shall 
constitute a guide for making decisions affecting land use and 
development as well as decisions affecting the development of public 
facilities and services. Public agencies and institutions shall share 
in the responsibility for ensuring that their actions are consistent 
with the plan. It is the intent of this Plan that it shall guide the 
general enactment and operation of development regulations, but that 
the actual issuance of development orders shall be in compliance with 
those regulations which implement this Plan. 

11.1.1. In those areas undergoing rapid land use transition, Special Area 
Studies shall be conducted to evaluate the specific needs of 
those locations, (see Definition in Glossary) 

11.1.2. The Future Land Use Map of Alachua County shall display the 
general distribution of the following land use classifications: 

Urban Residential Recreation and Open Space 

Industrial Rural Residential 

Institutional Tourist/Entertainment Centers 

Activity Centers Airport Impact 

Rural Cluster Rural Employment Centers 
Rural Activity Centers 

11.1.3. Maps contained within the Land Use Element serve as a guide for 
future development. Interpretation of the maps shall be 
performed in conjunction with the provisions of the Ccmprhensive 
Plan. 

11.1.3.1. The major existing Tourist /Entertainment, Recreation and 
Open Space, and Institutional land uses are depicted on 
the Future Land Use Plan map. However, these uses 
exhibit a wide range of scales and intensities which 
are difficult to anticipate and display on the maps. 
Therefore, the policies and standards for these three 
land uses shall guide location decisions and no Land 
Use Plan Map amendments shall be required. Major 
industrial areas are shown on the Future Land Use Plan 
map, however, policies shall guide the consideration of 
industrial developments outside of designated 
industrial areas. 

11.1.4. Proposed changes in the zoning map shall be considered in li^t 
of the Comprehensive Plan and its various elements, and shall 
also be considered in li^t of: 

(a) the availability and capacity of public facilities required 
to serve the development; 



77 



(b) the relationship of the proposed development to existing 
development in the vicinity; and 

(c) those factors specifically identified by law as purposes of 
zoning. 

11.2. URBAN RESIDENTIAL 

11.2.1. The nature and location of Urban Residential land uses shall be 
determined according to the principles established in the 
Residential Policy Section of Future Land Use (See Sec. 1.0). 

11.2.2. The Residential Density Checklist and the Compatibility Matrix 
shall serve as the primary means for determining the appropriate 
maximum density for a site. Other policies in the Comprehensive 
Plan may call for the adjustment of the appropriate density 
upwards or downwards. Additional policies or secondary means of 
adjustment, may occur in subsequent updates of existing plan 
elements. When secondary policies are adopted, this section 
shall be amended to reference specific standards for such 
increases or decreases. 

11.2.3. Once points have been totaled from the Residential Density 
Checklist, the final sum is then converted to Density using the 
Points/Density Conversion Table (See Table J))- 

11.2.4. Once densities have been determined from the Points/Density 
Conversion Table, adjustments shall be made according to the 
character of the surrounding neighborhood. This shall be done 
using the Compatibility Matrix (See Table 4). 

11.2.4.1. The Matrix shall be applied, in a pro-rated manner, in 
conjunction with all developed property within 400 feet 
of a development application. 

11.2.4.2. Property within 400 feet that is not in a residential 
use or property that is vacant shall neither exert a 
positive or negative influence in the final 
compatibility assessment. Property contained within a 
Planned Unit Development which is under construction 
shall be considered "developed" at the density of the 
overall Planned Unit Development. Parcels of 10 acres 
or greater shall be considered vacant for the purposes 
of the compatibility matrix. 

11.2.5. Buffer Group Matrix 

11.2.5.1. Buffers shall be required between two adjacent uses 
generally as described in Table 5- The details of this 
requirement shall be reflected in the development 
regulations. 



78 



11. 2. 5 •2. Specific buffer requirements, including hei^t, depth, and 
combination of plant material, shall be described in the 
development regulations which implement this plan. 

1 1.2. 5.3 • A proposed use, at the time it develops, shall provide the 
required buffer between the two uses. Separate requirements 
may be imposed between developments of the same density or 
where buffer areas are incorporated into individual lots. 

11.2.5.4. Buffers may be used for passive reaction provided that the 
total buffer remains intact. 

11.2.6. In those instances when the Residential Density Checklist and 
Ccmpatibility Matrix would call for a density out of scale and 
character with the immediate surrounding residential development, 
those portions of the site immediately adjacent to existing 
residential land should be developed at a similar scale and 
intensity. 

11.3 ACTIVITY CENTERS 

11.3.1. The nature and location of Activity Centers shall be determined 
according to the principles established in the Activity Center 
Policy Section of Future Land Use (See Sec. 2.0. ). 

11.3.1.1. Level of Activity Center Average Daily Traffic 

Hi^ 50,000 + 

Medium 20,000 - 49,999 

Low 4,000 - 19,999 

11.3.1.2. The ADT generated is determined on the basis of the 
total number of vehicle trips per day generated by each 
type of land use in the activity center (see Appendix 
A. If the land use is not listed in Appendix A, then 
the source listed for all Traffic Generation Rates 
shall be utilized.) 

11.3.2. Future Activity Centers, Fhiral Activity Centers, and 
Tourist/Entertainment Centers shall be shown on the Future Land 
Use Map. However, these activity centers will not generate 
points on the Residential Density Checklist. 

11.3.3. The boundaries of urban activity centers are fixed. Proposals 
to extend the boundaries of those activity centers shall be 
considered amendments to the Land Use Element of the 
Comprehensive Plan (See Appendix B). 

11.3.4 A Special Area Study shall be prepared whenever the status of an 
Activity Center is proposed to be changed. Any redesignation of 
the Activity Center shall require an amendment to the 
Comprehensive Plan. 

11.3.5 Detailed land use and design studies should be prepared for each 
activity center to guide development decision making within each 
center. These studies should produce plan amendments that 
incorporate detailed policy direction within the Plan. 

79 



11.3.6 Distance from activity centers are measured in a straight line 
from the nearest edge of a parcel to the boundary of the higjhest 
level activity center. Points will be assigned only if there is 
bicycle or pedestrian access from the parcel to the activity 
center . 

11.4. INSTITUTIONAL 

11.4.1. The nature and location of Instutitional land uses shall be 
determined according to the principles established in the 
Institutional Policy Section of Future Land Use (See Sec. 5.0). 

11.4.2. Points accrued for primary and secondary schools on the 
Residential Density Checklist shall be granted for access to 
schools operated by the Alachua County School Board. 

11.4.3. Land proposed to be donated for school sites must be approved by 
the Alachua County School Board. The following minimum size 
standards have been recommended by the School Board: 

Elementary School 15 acres 
Middle School 30 acres 
Hi^ School 60 acres 

11.5. RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE 

11.5.1. The Recreation and Open Space Element of the Comprehensive Plan 
shall designate areas which are in need of recreation 
facilities. All proposed sites shall conform with the Recreation 
and Open Space Element. 

11.5.2. Land proposed to be donated to the County for Nei^borhood or 
Community level recreational facility development shall be well 
drained and shall not contain hydric soils (see 8.1.2e). 

11.5.3 Residential Density Points may only be accrued for accessibility 
to Nei^borhood and Community level recreation facilities. 

11.6. CONSERVATION 

11.6.1. Any necessary studies for the determination of impacts of 
development proposals shall be the responsibility of the 
developer . 

11.7. ROADWAYS 

11.7.1 The functional classification of existing roadways (i.e. local, 
collector or arterial) is identified in the Transportation 
Element. 

11.7.1.1 The level of service is the quality of service provided 
by a roadway under a given set of operating 
conditions. Level D is the lowest acceptable level of 
service of the adopted Gainesville Urban Area 
Transportation Study (GUATS) 2005 Plan. 

80 



11.7.2. Those portions of the roadway infrastructure programmed for 
improvement in functional classification or level of service ("D" 
or "better), as specified in the five year Transportation 
Improvement Plan (TIP), shall warrant increased Residential 
Density Points. In these cases, the points shall be calculated 
in the following manner: 

■5- X (Future Points - Current Points) + Current Points 

11.8. POTABLE WATER AND SANITARY SEWER ■ 

11.8.1. Residential density points (See Table 2) shall be granted under 
the following circumstances: 

a. For land that meets the criteria established on the 
Residential Density Checklist; or 

b. For planned extensions as identified in the capital 
improvement programs of the various municipalities; or 

c. For developer initiated extensions that are in compliance, 
with the Sanitary Sewer and Potable Water Elements of the 
Alachua County Comprehensive Plan and that have received 
extension approval from the Alachua County Commission. 

11.8.2. Central water and sanitary sewer lines shall not be extended 
outside urban clusters except under the following circumstances: 

a. unless the absense of such facilities would result in a 
threat to the public health or safety; or 

b. as part of a comprehensive expansion of public services to 
encourage growth in a new area. 

11.9. MASS TRANSIT 

11.9.1 Mass Transit points shall be granted for regularly scheduled 
fixed route public service only and excludes access to the mini- 
bus service. 

11.10. DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS 

11.10.1. The County shall prepare a multi-year Capital Improvement Program 
as an implementation mechanism of this document. 

11.10.2. Development regulations implementing this Land Use Element shall 
be prepared in accordance with and consistent with the Policies 
and Standards contained herein. 



81 



11.10.2.1. Within twelve (12) months after adoption of this Plan, a 
proposed comprehensive revision of the Zoning Ordinance 
(including the Zoning Map) shall be presented by the staff 
for Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners 
review. Within ei^teen (18) months after adoption, the 
Board of County Commissioners shall take formal action on 
the adoption of comprehensive revisions. 

11.10.2.2. The following policies shall govern existing situations 
which do not conform to the provisions of the Plan: 

(a) Development which exists on land zoned to a higher 
density or intensity of use than is provided in the 
Comprehensive Plan shall be permitted to continue. 
Proposals for the substantial expansion of such 
development shall be considered in light of the 
policies and intent of the plan. 

(b) Where undeveloped land is zoned for non-residential 
uses and the plan calls for residential use, studies 
shall be conducted to determine whether the plan 
policies permit the non-residential use. When non- 
residential use is not found to be applicable, zoning 
changes to appropriate residential categories shall be 
considered. 

(c) Where land is zoned for a hi^er density residential 
category than is indicated by the application of the 
Residential Density Checklist or other policies 
contained in this Plan, studies shall be conducted to 
determine the appropriate residential zoning category, 
and zoning changes to the appropriate category shall be 
considered. 

(d) Approved PUD zoned developments shall be deemed to be 
consistent with this Plan. Should approval of a PUD 
plan expire, however, reapproval shall be given in 
conformity with the provisions of this Plan. 

11.10.3- The following general modifications should be made to the Zoning 
Ordinance text: 

(a) Zoning categories shall be realigned to produce more 
consistent development within each. Mixture of different 
dwelling types should occur within planned unit developments 
rather than in conventional zones. 

(b) Some clustering should be permitted as a design option 
within conventional zones. PUD zoning should not be the 
only option available for projects in which some innovation 
is desired. Limited bonus density credits should be awarded 
for cluster development within conventional zones. 



82 



(c) Threshold standards for PUD zoning should be increased 
(i.e.: minimum acrea^). Basic density within a PUD project 
shall be consistent with this Plan, however, provision 
should be included within the ordinance for awarding density- 
credit based on exceptional design. Density credit may be 
allowed for areas designated on the Plan for non-residential 
development throu^ a substi tilt ion formula to be contained 
within the ordinance. 

(d) Mixed use planned unit developments should be encouraged, 
rather than discouraged. Commercial development should only 
be permitted within a planned unit development consistent 
with this Plan. 



11.11. PROCESS FOR CONTINUED REVISIO N OF THE PLAN 

It is the objective of this planning effort to ensure the 
maintenance of a realistic and viable set of planning policies to 
guide the growth and development of Alachua County. It is also the 
objective of this effort to develop a simple, complete, concise 
document containing these policies. Seeing the necessity for the 
continued maintenance of the Plan, it shall be the policy of Alachua 
County to establish a mechanism for annual consideration of the Land 
Use Element as follows: 

(a) During the first year following the effective date, all proposals 
for amendments to this Element, including proposals to amend the 
Land Use Plan map, shall be collected and processed no more than 
once every four months pursuant to a schedule and procedures to 
be announced prior to the deadline for submission; 

(b) Thereafter, all proposals for amendments to this Element, 
including proposals to amend the Land Use Plan map, shall be 
collected and processed one time each year pursuant to a schedule 
and procedures to be announced prior to the deadline for 
submission; 

(c) where unusual circumstances dictate, the Board of County 
Commissioners may authorize by resolution the expedited 
processing of a plan amendment. "Unusual circumstances" shall be 
as determined by the Board of County Commissioners, but may 
include, at least, the consideration of proposals which result in 
the substantial improvement to the local economy or the 
substantial protection of environmentally sensitive lands. 

(d) all amendments shall be considered in light of the applicable 
policies and objectives of this Element, and shall be considered 
in light of the Basic Principles upon which the Plan is based. 

(e) in making an amendment to this Element, every consideration 
should be given to alternatives to detailed map changes. Such 
alternatives mi^t include clarifying text amendments and 
additional policy statements. 



83 



11.12. CONSISTENCY OF ELIMENTS 

11.12.1. All Plan elements shall be made consistent. As elements or 
portions are amended, the most recent amendment shall override 
inconsistencies until other elements or portions thereof are 
subsequently made to be consistent. 

11.13. ANNEXATIONS 

Annexations should be permitted to accommodate the grovrth and 
development of communities consistent with the overall policy of urban 
clusters. Annexation shall not be permitted where they occur for the 
purpose of converting rural land to urban use unless there is an 
established program of infrastructure improvements designed to support 
such conversions. The expanding community must develop a "track 
record" of implementing programmed improvements as a basis for 
territorial expansion. Annexations which are made for the purpose of 
limiting or restricting development (where development is consistent 
with this plan) are inappropriate. 



84 



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Table 3 





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Table 


Points 


Density 
(Dwelling Units/Acre) 


Points 


Density 
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30 


1.00 


8 


6.24 


31 


1.30 


9 


6.52 


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70 


6.80 


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71 


7.09 


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2 


7.39 


— «35 


1.54 


3 


7.72 


36 


1.61 


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7 


1.70 


75 


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1.75 


76 


8.80 


9 


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9.14 


40 


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41 


1.99 


9 


9.90 


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2.08 


80 


10.40 


3 


2.16 


81 


10.82 


4 


2.26 


2 


11.30 


45 


2.36 


3 


11.80 


46 


2.46 


4 


12.24 


7 


2.57 


85 


12.80 


8 


2.66 


86 


13.38 


9 


2.78 


7 


13.98 


50 


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51 


3.04 


9 


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3.17 


90 


15.84 


3 


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91 


16.56 


4 


3.44 


2 


17.28 


55 


3.60 


3 


18.00 


56 


3.76 


4 


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7 


3.91 


95 


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4.10 


96 


20.47 


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21.35 


60 


4.40 


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22.27 


1 


4.64 


9 


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4.80 


100 


24.00 


3 


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24.00 


4 


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24.00 


65 


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103 


24.00 


66 


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104 


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88 



II 
II 

II 

1) 

II 
K 



II 



Appendix A 
Trip Generation Rates 




FUrURE 

lAHD 

USE 

m 

4r 



TablB6 



Qenerator 



Vehicle Trips To and From 
(per day per^ 





DWFTJJNG 


1000 sq. ft. 






UNIT 


GFA 


B1PID\'EE 


Residential 








Residential Single Family 








Detached 


11.0 






Residential Single P^mily 








Attached 


9.2 






ttati Family 


7.4 






Mobile Home 


5.3 






Retirement Ooinnunity 


3.5 






Retail 








Free Standing 








Supermarket 




135.3 


- 


Qlscount Store 




64.6 


- 


Discount Store w/Supermkt. 




81.2 


30.3 


Department Store 




36.1 


32.8 


Auto Supply 




88.8 


- 


New Car Dealer 




44.3 


- 


Convenience 








(24 hrs.) 




577.0 


- 


(15-16 hrs.) 




322.0 


- 


Truck Terminal 




9.86 


6.99 



Shopping Center 
0-49,999 sq. ft. 
50,000-99,999 sq. ft. 
100,000-199,999 sq. ft. 
200,000-299,999 sq. ft. 
300.000-399,999 sq. ft. 
400,000-499,999 sq. ft. 
500,000-999,999 sq. ft. 
1,000,000-1.249,999 sq. ft. 
Over 1.250.000 sq. ft. 

Industrial /Manufacturing 

Free Standing General ^lanufacturing 

Warehouse 

Research/Development 

Industrial Park 

General Light Industry 

All Industry Average 

Offices 

General 
Medical 
Governmental 
Engineering 
Civic Center 
Office Park 
ReseEirch Center 

Restaurants 

Quality Restaurant 
Other Sit-Down 
East Pood 

Banks 

Parks and Recitation 

Marina 
Golf Course 
Bowling 

Participant Sports 
City Park 
County Park 
State Park 
Wilderness Park 
National Monument 
Lake/Boating 
Animal Attractions 



270.9 
79.1 
60.4 
49.9 
40.4 
47.6 
34.5 
31.1 
26.5 



4.2 
5.3 
5.1 
8.8 
5.5 
5.5 



56.3 
198.5 
533.0 

38.8 



2.3 
4.4 
2.4 

3.9 
3.2 
3.0 



75 



1000 
900 

81.9 



40.5 
67.5 
60.8 
71.9 
51.9 
59.9 



11.7 


3.5 


145 


63.5 


25.0 


426 


48.3 


12.0 


66 


23.0 


3.5 


282 


25.0 


6.1 


33 


21.0 


3.3 


277 


9.3 


3.1 


37 



200 

932 
1825 



259.0 


18.5 


34.2 


7.4 


- 


296.3 


- 


26.5 


_ 


60.0 


26.5 


5.1 


61.1 


0.6 


- 


0.0 


- 


11.9 


- 


3.6 


- 


72.2 



91 



Table 6 Continued 



Generator 




Vehicle Trips To and From 
(per day per^ 


Hospitals 




staff 


Bed 


Acre 


All Categories 
Gaieral 
Qiildrens 
Convalescent 
University 
Veterans 
Nursing Home 
Clinics 




6.1 
5.9 
10.1 
4.5 
7.8 
2.2 

5.9 


14.8 

14.0 

25.2 

3.2 

37.0 

3.8 

2.7 


49 


Educational 




Student 


Staff 




All Categories 
Four Year University 
Jr. College 
Secondary School 
Elementary School 
Canbined Elementary/Secondary 
School 
Libraries 


1.8 
2.5 
1.5 
1.4 
0.6 

0.8 
41.8 


13.6 
9.8 
28.2 
19.9 
11.7 

11.8 
51.0 


40 


Airports 




Takeoff /landing 


Dnployee 


Acre 


General AviaticM 
Comnercial 




2.5 
• 11.8 


6.5 
16.8 


3.6 


Hotel/Motel 




Room 


Etaployee 




HDtel 
NkJtel 
Resort Hotel 




10.5 

9.6 

10.2 


11.3 
10.6 
10.3 




Mscellaneous 




Station 


Punp 




Service Station 




748 


133 




Source: National Cooperative 
Quick-Response Urban 


Hi^way Research Program Report 187, 

Travel Estimation Techniques and Transferrable 


Parameters, Users Guide 


, Transportation Research Board, 


1975. 1 



9? 



Appendix B 
Activity Center IMaps 




FUTURE 

lAHD 

USE 



II 



OAKS MALL 



high activity center 




95 



GAINESVILLE MALL 



high activity center 




96 



MILLHOPPER 



medium activity center 




97 



ARCHER RD. & S.W. 34 ♦h ST. 

medium activity center 




98 



N.W. 39th AVE & 1-75 



lo>v activity center 



6038 




99 



RIDGEWAY 



low activity center 




100 



WILLISTON RD. & 
S.W. 13 ♦h ST. 



low activity center 



7263 



7263- I 



-tar 




101 



SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

low activity center 



(230 •« 10 




19 

U30-2* 



it 
USO-Zt 



rH£ VILLAGE 
SANTA Ft f* 

6230 sa- 



lt 

(2J0-U 



tl 

(ISO -21 



102 



N.E. 39th AVE. & N. MAIN ST. 

low activity center 



MM rucc 



I'l'lH'I'l 



nC 42ND Place 




IWNE "pOHFS T EST»TCS iUNITI ^ I ' 1 



» n I » ?7 



8159-2 



8247 



g T .5 



"* ' ■>" IV 



8159-3 



•" i 




8231 -2 



* 8 MO-41 



so' OOUNASC CtSCHCNT- 



)C PROPOSED ROAO 



:Si» a 



NOMTH MAIN STNEIT 7 
COtMIERCIAL PARK m 



ii N t 34 TH PL 



■ZSI -S9 

LOT I 



103 



WILLISTON RD. & 1-75 



low activity center 




7240 



104 



EASTGATE 

low activity center 




105 



ALACHUA 

low activity center 




106 



HIGH SPRINGS 



low activity center 




107 



HIGH SPRINGS PLAZA 



low activity center 




108 



HAWTHORNE 



low activity center 




19618 



^194 84 -I 



109 



^ 



Keyword Index 




FUrURE 

lAHD 

USE 

4r 



J 



Access, 

3.4., 5.2.1(c), 5.6.1., 
5.7.1,, 6.3.3. 

Accessible, 

3.6.2.4., 5.2.11.1., 
5.8.1. 

Accessibility, 

3.9., 4.3.1(c)., 5.3.4.. 
5.3.5., 5.4.1., 11.5.3. 

Activity Center (a) 

vi, 1.2.3., 1.3.10.2.. 

1.3.2(c), 2.0. , 2.1.1., 

2.1.2., 2.1.3., 2.1.4., 

3.1.2 (a), 3.4., 3.8., 

3.9.1.1.; 

Medium, 1.3.10.1., 2.3., 

2.3.1., 5.3.1(c). 

Lew, 2.4., 2.4.1. , ; 

High, 1.3.10.1., 1.3.10.3, 

2.2., 2.2.1., 5.3.1 (c). 

Rural, 2.5., 2.5.1., 

2.5.2,, 3.9.1.1.; 

University of Florida, 

1.3.10.1., 2.6., 2.6.1., 

2.6.2. 

Adequate Public Facilities 
and Services, 

1.5.1., 1.5.2.. 4.4.1. 

Adjacent, 

Development. 1.3.8.1(c). 
Adjacent Property, 1.4.4., 
8.4.2. 

Agricultural, 
Areas, 7.1.2.; 
Lands, 7.1.3.; 
Uses, 7.1.1. 

Agriculturally Oriented 
Industry, 
4.1.1.1. 

Agriculture, 

Activities. 1.3.11.1. 



Airport. 
1.3.3.; 

Cargo Terminals. 4.2.2.; 
Impact Policies. 9.0 

Alachua County. 

1.1.6.. 1.5.2., 3.1.6., 

4.1.3.. 10.4.2., 10.5.4., 

9,5.5.; 

Board of County 

Commissioners, 10.3.1., 

10.5.1.; 

School Board, 1.5.2., 

6.2.3., 10.5.7. 

Annual Inundation, 
8.1.2(a). 

Aquifer Recharge Areas, 

vi, 6.2.1., 8.1.2(f), 8.2.2 

Arterial Streets. 

1.5.1(a). 1.3.8.1(a)., 
3.4., 3.4.1.1, 3.5.1.1.. 
3.6.1.1., 3.8.1.1., 
3.10.1.3,, 4.2.2., 
4.3.1(c)., 5.3.4., 5.5.3., 
7.1.5. 

Average Daily Traffic (ADT), 
2.1.5., 11.3.1.1., 
11.3.1.2., 11.7.1., 
11.7.1.1. 



Basic Principles, 
v, vi, X. 

Bicyclists, 

3.6.2.4., 3.7.2.5. 

Bicycle, 
1.4.3. 

Bike, 

Paths, 6.3.1.; 

Bikeway, 

1.3.2.2., 1.5.1(g)., 

5.3.5.. 

Access. 1.3.10.2. 



Board of County Commissioners, 
10.3.1., 10.5.1. 

Branch Libraries, 
5.4.1. 

Buffering, 

1.1.4(c), 1.1.5., 1.3.2.4., 
1.3.8.1(c)., 3.7.2.1., 
4.3.2(b). 



Campground, 
3.10.1.3, 

Capacity, 

1.2.4.. 3.2.1. 

Capital, 

Facilities, vi. ; 
Improvement, 1.5.2. 
Improvements Program, 
1.2.4., 1.2.6., 1.5.1., 
3.2.1.. 11.9.1. 

Cargo Airport Terminals. 
4.2.2. 

Central Business District, 
3.1.6. 

Central Water, 

1,3,7.1., 7.1.4. 

Centroid, 

2.1.2. 
Channelization, of streams, 
8.1.11 
Children, 

5.3.3. 

Churches, 

1.3.2.2., 5.1.1(e). 

Circulation, 

1.3.2.3.. 1,4.1.3. 

City of Gainesville, 
i, 3.1,6. 

Civic/Cultural /Entertainment 
Center, 
3.1.6. 



113 



Extractive Industry. 
4.1.1.1. 



Fences, 

1.3.2.4(a). 

Final Site Plans, 
10.4.1. 

Financial Center 
3.1.6. 

Fire, 

1.1.1., 1.2.1(a), 1.2.1(c), 

1.5.2(d), 2.1.1., 3.3.1, 

5.5.; 

Hazards, 4.1.3.1(d).; 

Stations, 1.2.1., 5.5., 

5.5.1., 5.5.2., 5.5.3. 

Flood, 

Damage, 8.4.2. 
Hazard, vi., 8.1.2(c). 

Florida Department of 
Environmental Regulation 
(DER), 
8.1.6. 

Florida Statutes, Chanter 
380, 

10.1.4. 

Freeway Interchange, 
3.5.1.1(b)., 3.10.1.1. 

Fresh Water Marsh, 
8.1.2(b)(1). 

Full Line Department Store, 
3.5. 

Fumes, 

4.1.3.1(c). 

Furniture, 
3.5. 



Gainesville Regional Airport, 
1.3.3., 9.1.1. 

Gainesville Regional 
Utilities, 
1.5.2. 

Game Management Area, 
8.3.1(b). 

Gases, 

4.1.3.1(c). 

Gasoline Station, 
3.10. 

General Merchandise, 
3.5. 



General Welfare, 
1.1.2. 

Geologic Management Area, 
8.1.2(d) . 

Glare, 

4.1.3.1(i). 

Government /Professional 
Office Center, 
3.1.6. 

Governmental Uses, 
5.1.1. 

Green Belt, 
6.1.2. 

Gross Density, 

1.2.1., 1.2.1(b), 1.2.1(c), 
1.2.1(e), 1.2.2., 1.2.2(a). 

Gross Leaseable Area, 
3.5., 3.6., 3.7., 3.8. 



H 



Handicapped Housing, 
1.1.7. 

Headwaters, 
8.1.3. 

Health, 

7.1.4., 7.2.1.; 

Care Facilities, 5.1.1., 

5.8.1. 

High Density, 

1.2.2(a), 1.3.9.1., 
1.3.10., 1.3.10.2., 

Highway (s) , 

3.5.1.2., 4.3.1.; 
Highway Capacity, 3.2.1. 

Home Furnishings, 
3.5. 

Hospitals, 

S.-^.l., 5.8.2. 

Housing, 

Costs, 1.2.1(e) 
Element, 1.1.7 
Handicapped, 1.1.7 

Hydric Soils, 

8.1.2(e), 9.3.1(a), 11.5.2, 



Impact (s ) 

i., 1. 3. 3., 3.1.4., 
3.6.2.2., 4.1.1.1., 5.9.1., 
5.9.4., 5.2.12.5.. 6.3.2., 
8.1.3., 10.4.2., 11.3.4.; 
Regional and Local, 10.1.3. 



Incompatible, 
1.4.1.1. 

Land Use(s), 1.3.2., 
6.2.2. 

Industrial, 

4.2.1., 4.2.2., 4.2.3. 
Development, 1.1.1., 
4.1.1., 4.1.1.1., 
4.4.1., 4.4.2.; 
District (s), 
4.3.1., 

Infill, 

3.4.1.2., 3.4.1.4., 
3.9.1.1. 

Infrastructure, 
vi., 10.5.1. 

Ingress, 

3.5.2.1., 3.6.2.1., 
3.7.2.2. 

Innovative Concepts, 
1.4.1. 

Innovative Designs, 
vii., 1.2.1(e). 

Institutional Uses, 
1.3.10.1., 2.2.2., 
2.3.2., 2.4.2., 2.6.2. 
5.1.1., 5.2.3., 5.2.4. 

Intensity, 

vi., 1.4.1.4., 2.1.2., 
11.2.5. 

Internal Circulation, 
1.3.2.3. 

Internal Separation, 
1.4.3. 

Intersections, 

2.1.3., 3.5.1.1. (a), 
3.6.1.1., 3.7.1.1(a). 
3.8.1.1., 3.10.1.1., 
4.3.3. 

Interstate 75, 

1.1.5., 3.10.1.1. 



Junior Deoartment Store, 
3.6. 



Lake(s), 

8.1.3., 8.2.3.; 
Shorelines, 8.1.2(a) 

Land , 

Costs, 6.2.3. 
Reclamation, 8.1.5. 
Use Intensity, vi . 



114 



Land Use Plan Map(s), 
1.3.3., 3.8., 10.3.1. 

Landfill, 

5.9.2., 5.9.4. 

Land locking, 
1.4.4. 

Law Enforcement Facilities, 
5.6.1. 

Leading Tenant, 

3.1.9., 3.5., 3.6., 3.7., 
3.8. 

Libraries, 

5.1.1(b)., 5.4., 5.4.1.; 
Branch, 5.4.1. 

Lighting, 

3.7.2.1., 4.3.2(b). 

Local Economy, 
7.1.1. 

Local Impacts, 
10.1.3. 

Local Streets, 

3.7.1.1(b)., 5.3.3, 6.2.4, 

Location and Compatibility, 
3.5.1., 3.6.1., 3.7.1., 
3.8.1., 3.9.1., 3.10.1., 
4.2., 5. 2., 6.2., 8.2., 
10.3. 

Lodging, 
3.10. 

Low Density, 

iii, 1.2.2(a), 1.3.6., 
1.3.6.1., 1.3.6.2., 

Low Intensity Development, 
vi. 

Low-Medium Density, 
1.2.2(a)., 1.3.7., 
1.3.7.1., 1.3.7.2. 



M 



Maintenance Costs, 
6.2.3. 

Major Arterial Streets, 
3.8.1.1. 

Major Collector, 
3.8.1.1. 

Major Highways, 
2.1.3. 

Major Street (s), 
5.6.1.. 5.7.1.; 
Systems, 1.3.2.3. 



Major Transportation 
Corridors, 
5.2.2. 

Management Areas, 
vi., 8.1.2(d). 

Marine Business Uses, 
3.10.1.3. 

Market Area, 
3.1.3.; 

Radius, 3.5., 3.6., 
3.7. 

Mass Transit, 

vi., 1.1.1. 5.8.1., 11.9.1 
Vehicles, 3.5.1.3. 

Mass Transportation, 
3.5.1.3., 3.6.2.4. 

Medical Support Facilities 
and Services, 
5.8.2. 

Medium Density, 

1.2.2(a), 1.3.8., 1.3.8.1., 
1.3.8.2. 

Medium-High Density, 

1.2.2(a), 1.3.9., 1.3.9.1., 
1.3.9.2. 

Metropolitan Transportation 
Planning Organization, 
1.2.4., 3.2.1., 4.4.2. 

Minimum Site Area, 
3.5., 3.6., 3.7. 

Minor Arterial Streets, 
5.2.6.4. 

Mixed Use PUD. 
1.4.1.6. 

Mobile Home, 

1.1.2., 1.1.3., 1.1.4., 
1.3.6.4. 

Modular Housing, 

1.3.6.2., 1.3.9.2. 

Muck, 

8.1.2(e). 

Multi-Family, 

1.1.4., 1.3.8.1., 1.3.9.2. 

Multiple Use Forestry 
Practices, 
7.1.3. 

Museums, 
5.1.1(b). 



IM 



Natural, 

Barriers, 6.1.1.; 
Environment, i., 1.4.2(a), 



3.10.1.3., 6.1.3.; 
Gas, 4.3.1(d).; 
Limitations to 
Development, 8.1.1.; 
Systems, 8.1.3., 9.4.2.,; 
Water Bodies, 8.1.2(a). 

Neighborhoods ( s ) , 

2.1.3., 6.1.1.; 

Convenience, 3.8., 

3.8.1.1., 3.8.1.2.; 

Shopping Center 2.4.1., 

3.1.2. (a), 3.7.1.1., 

3.7.2.3., 3.7.2.5., 

3.7.1.2.; 
Single Family, 3.8.1.2. 

Net Density, 
1.2.1(e). 

New Commercial Development, 
3.2.1. 

New Community, 

10.1.1., 10.2.1., 10.3.1., 
10.4.1., 10.5.2., 10.5.3. 

New Development, 
1.4.3., 1.4.4. 

Noise, 

3.7.2.1., 4.1.3.1(b)., 

4.3.2(b).; 

Attenuation Area, 1.3.3.; 

5.3.1. (a), 5.4.2.; 9.1.1, 

9.3.1 

Impact, 1.3.3.;. 

Sensitive District, 1.3.3. 

5.3.1 (a), 5.4.2.; 9.1.1., 

9.2.1 

Traffic, 1.1.5. 

Non-Residential Uses, 

1.4.1.5. 
Nursery Schools, 5.3.1. (c) 
Nursing Homes. 

5.1.1(c). 



Odor. 

4.1.3.1(c). 

Off-street Parking, 
1.1.4(a), 4.3.2(a). 

Office(s) , 

1.4.1.6(a), 2.2.1., 2.3.1., 
2.4.1., 3.4.1.4., 3.9., 
3.9.1.1., 3.9.1.2., 
3.9.1.3. ; 
Parks, 3.9. 

Open Space. 

1.1.1.. 1.1.4(b), 
1.3.2.1(a).. 1.3.2.4(a).. 
1.3.8.1(c).. 1.3.9.1.. 
1.4.1.3., 1.4.2(b), 
6.1.1.. 6.1.2., 6.1.3.. 
6.2.2., 6.3.1., 6.3.2. 

Operating Size, 
5.2.1(b). 



115 



Orderly Use of Land, 
3.1.7. 

Overall Site Design, 
8.3.1(c). 



Parking, 
1.1.4(a).; 

Off-street, 1.1.4(a)., 
4.3.2(a). 

Parks, 

1.2.1(a), 1.2.1(c), 
1.3.2.1(a)., 1.3.2.2., 
1.5.1(c).; 
Community, 6.2.4.; 
Donated, 6.3.3.; 
Neighborhood, 6.2.4., 
Proposed, 6.2.7. 
Travel Trailer, 3.10.1.3. 

Peat, 

8.1.2(e). 

Pedestrian(s) , 

1.4.3., 1.5.2(g), 3.5.2.3., 

3.6.2.1., 3.6.2.4., 

3.7.2.4., 

Access, 1.3.10.2.; 

Facilities, 3.3.1 

Mall, 3.5.2.2., 3.6.2.4., 

3.7.2.5. 

Phasing Plan, 
vii., 10.4.1. 

Physical, 

Barriers, 1.3.2.4(a).; 

Characteristics, 

1.3.8.1(b)., 

1.3.8.2(b).; 

Forms , i . ; 

Limitation, 1.2.3. 

Planned Industrial Dis^-ricts, 
4.3.1. 

Planned Unit Development 
(PUD), 

1.1.4., 1.4.1., 1.4.1(a)., 

■ 1.4.1.1., 1.4.1.2., 
1.4.1.3., 1.4.1.4., 
1.4.1.5., 1.4.1.6., 
1.4.1.7., 1.4.2. 
Mixed Use, 1.4.1.6. 

Planted Areas, 

■ 1.3.8.1(c). 

Police, 

1.1.1., 2.1.1. 

Potable Water Supply, 
1.5.1(e), 10.8. 

Power Lines, 
6.2.4. 

.Primary Schools, 
1.5.1(b). 



Prime Industrial Locations, 
4.2.2. 

Professional Service Uses, 
3.9. 

Programmed Improvements, 
4.4.2. 

Public, 

Benefits, 10.3.1.; 
Capital, 10.5.2. ; 
Facilities, 1.2.1(a)., 
1.2.1(c)., 1.4.1.3. 
1.5.1., 1.5.2., 3.3.1.; 
Infrastructure* vi.; 
Investment vi.; 
Parks and Recreation, vi. 
Participation, 10.3.1.; 
Safety, 6.2.4. ; 
Schools, 1.1.1. 
Streets, 3.5.1.2.; 
Uses, 1.3.1(a).; 
Utilities, 5.1.1., 5.9.1. 



Radioactive, 

Elements, 4.1.3.1(e). 

Rail, 

Facility, 4.3.1(c)., 4.3.3. 
Lines, 4.2.2. 

Railroad(s) , 
4.2.5.3.; 
Tracks, 6.2.4.; 
-Highway Intersection, 
4.3.3. 

Recreation, 

vii., 1.1.1., 1.1.4(b)., 

1.3.9.2.. 8.1.4.; 

and Open Space Element, 

11.5.2. ; 

Areas, 5.3.2(b)., 6.1.1., 

6.3.1., 6.3.2. 

Recreational and Open Space 
Land Uses, 

6.1.3., 6.2.2. 

Recreational Water Resources, 
6.2.5. 

Refuge Area, 
8.3.1(b). 

Refuse Disposal Area, 
5.2.3. 



Regional, 

Shopping Center, 2.2.1., 
3.1.2. (a) 3.5., 3.5.1.1., 
3.5.2.2., 3.5.1.3., 
3.5.2.2., 3.5.3.1. 



Required Facilities and 
Services, 
3.3. 

Residential, 

Areas, 1.3.2.1., 

1.3.2.1(a)., 2.7., 

3.6.2.2., 

3.7.2.1., 4.1.1.1., 4.2.1, 

5.2.6.2(a)., 5.2.6.5., 

5.2.12.2., 5.3.2(a)., 

5.3.5., 6.3.1. 

Care Facilities, 1.3.4., 
1.3.4.; 

Density Checklist, 

vi., 1.1.7., 

1.3.10.3, 1.5.1, 1.5.2. 

Densities, vi., 1.2.1., 

1.2.1(b)., 1.2.3., 10.2.2. 

Development, vi., 1.1.5., 

1.1.6., 1.2.4., 1.3.1., 

1.3.2., 1.3.6.2., 

1.4.1., 1.5.2., 3.8., 

1.8.4.1. 

Land , 1.1.1. 



Restaurants, 

3.10., 3.10.1.3. 

Retail, 

1.3.2.1(b).; 
Retirement Centers, 5.11(c) 
Revenue Producing Uses, 

1.4.6(a). 

River (s ) , 

8.1.3., 8.2.3.; 
Banks, 8.1.2(a). 

Roads , 

vi., 1.2.1(a), 1.2.1(c). 

Roadway Commercial, 

3.4., 3.4.1.1., 3.4.1.2., 
3.4.1.3., 3.4.1.4., 
3.4.2.1.. 

Rural, 
7.1.4.; 

Area, 4.1.1.1.; 
Character, 1.3.11.1.; 
Residential, 1.2.2(b)., 
1.3.11., 1.3.11.1.; 
Residential District, 3.8., 
7.1.5. 



Safety, 

5.3.1(e)., 5.3.3., 5.3.5, 
7.1.4., 7.2.1. 

Sanitary, 

Landfill, 5.9.2.; 
Sewer, vi . , 1.3.7.1., 
1.5.1(f)., 7.1.4. 



116 



Schools, 

1.2.1(a)., 1.2.1(c)., 
1.3.2(a)(1)., 1.3.2.2., 
5.3.5.; 

Elementary, 5.3.2., 5.3.3. 
Junior High, 5.3.4.; 
Nursery, 5.1.1(a).; 
Primary, 1.5.1(b); 
Secondary, 1.5.1(b).; 
Senior High, 5.3.4. 



Screens, 

1.3.2.4(a)., 6.2.4. 

Secondary Schools, 
1.5.1(b). 

Senior High School, 
5.3.4. 

Sense of Community, 
1.4.2(d)., 6.2.3. 

Sensitive Environmental 
Character, 
8.1.1. 

Service Area, 

2.1.3., 5.2.1(a). 

Service Facilities, 
8.1.4. 

Sewage Treatment Plants, 
5.2.3., 5.9.2. 

Sewer (s), 

1.2.1(a)., 1.3.7.1., 
4.3.1(d). 

Shopping, 

Areas, 1.3.2.1(b).; 
Centers, 2.2.1., 3.1.3., 
3.1.9. 

Shores, 

8.1.3., 8.2.3. 

Sidewalks, 

X.3.2.2., 6.3.1. 

Signing, 

3.7.2.1., 4.3.2(b). 

Sinkhole Areas, 
6.1.1., 8.1.2(a) 

Site Size, 

3.8., 4.3.1(e). 

Sizing, 
10.5.1. 

Slope, 8.1.2. (a) 

Smoke, 

4.1.3.1(g). 

Social Mobility, 
i. 



Soil(s), 

vi., 1.3.8.1(b). 4.3.1(a)., 

8.1.2(e) ., 8.1.8. ; 

Conservation Service (SCS), 

8.1.2(e)., 8.1.8. 

Hydric, 8.1.2(e)., 

8.3.1(a)., 10.5.2; 
Solid Waste 
Spacing, 3.8. 

Collection and Disposal 3.3.1 
Special Area Study 11.1.1. 
Special Entertainment 
Facilities, 

3.10. 

Specalized Medical Centers, 
5.1.1(c). 

Staged, 
2.1.1.; 
Development, 1.1.1., 

Steeply Sloping Ridges, 
6.1.1. 

Storage, 

4.1. 
Storm Water 

Stream(s), Drainage and 
Disposal 3.3.1 

6.1.1.. 8.1.3., 8.2.3.; 

Banks, 8.1.2(a).; 

Channelization 8.1.11 

Flood Plains, 6.1.1., 

Streets, 

1.1.1., 1.3.7.1., 
2.1.1., 3.10.1.2.; 
Arterial, 1.3., 1.5.1(a)., 
1.3.8.1(a)., 3.4., 
3.4.1.1., 3.5.1.1., 
3.6.1.1., 3.7.1.1., 
3.8.1.1., 3.10.1.3., 
4.2.2., 4.3.1(c)., 
5.2.8.3., 5.3.4., 7.1.5.; 
Collector, 1.3.2.3., 
1.3.8.1(a).. 1.5.1(a).. 
3.7.1.1(a)., 5.3.3., 
6.2.4.; 

Local, 3.7.1.1(b)., 
6.2.4. r 

Lightning 3.3.1, 
Major Systems, 1.3.2.3.; 
Major Collector, 3.8.1.1., 
Public, 3.5.1.2.; 

Strip Commercial Development, 
3.1.2. 

Structure, 
8.4.2. 

Supermarket, 
3.6., 3.7. 

Supporting Community 
Facilities, 

1.1.1., 1.4.1.2., 2.1.1., 

Supporting Utilities, 
1.4.1.2. 



Target Pooulation. 
10.2.1." 

Theaters for the Performing 
Arts, 

5.1.1(b). 

Timed, 

1.1.1., 2.1.1. 

Timing and Sizing, 
10.5.1. 

Topography, 

vi., 1.4.4., 4.3.1(a)., 

8.1.2(a). 
Toxic Waste 4.1.3.1 

Traffic, 

3.10.1.2.; 
Traffic Hazards, 3.5.2.1. 
Transit Lines, 

1.3.10.2. 

Transition, 
3.9.1.1. 

Transportation, 

Arteries, 1.3.L0.2.; 
Efficiency, 5.2.3.; 
Element, 11.7.1 
Facilities, 3.2.1.; 
Improvement Program, 
1.2.4., 3.2.1., 4.4.2.; 
Mass, 3.5.1.3., 3.6.2.4.; 
System, 1.2.4. 

Travel Trailer Parks, 
3.10.1.3. 

Trips, 
3.2.1. 



U 



United States Environmental 
Protection Agency, (US EPA) 
8.1.6. 

University, 

2.6.1., 2.6.2. 

Unsuitable for Urban 
Development, 
6.1.1. 

Urban, 

Cluster, iii., vii., 
1.1.3.. 1.3.1., 2.1.2., 
3.3.1, 3.4.1.3., 4.1.1., 
4.1.1.1 .. 4.3.1., 5.1.2., 
6.1.3., 10.3.1.; 
Density. 1.2.2(a).; 
Separators, 6.1.2.; 



117 



Uses, 

Commercial, 2.1., 2.2.1., 

2.3.1., 2.4.1., 3.4., 

4.2.3.; 

Tourist Entertainment, 
3.10., 3.10.1.3., 
3.10,2.1. ; 

Complimentary Commercial, 

3.1.7.; 

Governmental, 5.1.1.; 

Incompatible Land, 1.3.2., 

4.2.2., 6.2.2.; 

Institutional, 2.2.2., 

2.3.2., 2.4.2., 5.1.1., 

5.2.2.; 

Mixed PUD, 1.4.1.6.; 

Non-Residential, 1.4.1.5.; 

Orderly Use of Land, 

3.1.7.; 

Professional Services, 

3.9.; 

Public, 1.3.2.1(a).; 

Recreation and Open Space 

Land , 6.2.2.; 

Viable Use of Land, 3.1.7, 

Warehouse, 4.1. 



Utilities, 

1.1.1., 1.3.7.1., 
2.1.1., 4.3.1(d) . 



Water, 

4.3.1(d).; 

Central, 1.3.7.2., 7.1.4. 
Potable, 1.5.1(e).; 
Quality, 4.3.5.; 
Retention Areas, 8.3.1(c) 
Supply, vi., 3.3.1 

Well Balanced Community, 
10.1.2. 

Wet Praires, 
8.1.2(b)(2). 

Wetland(s), 
8.2.2.; 

Areas, 8.1.3., 8.1.4., 
8.2.3.; 

Hardwood Swamps, 
8.1.2(b)(4).; 
Vegetation, 8.1.8. 

Wholesale Distribution, 
4.1. 

Wildlife, 

Management Area, 
8.1.2(d). 
Preserve, 8.3.1(b). 



V 



Zero Lot Line, 
1.3.6.2. 



Vacant Parcels, 
3.1.2. 

Vapors, 

4.1.3.1(c). 



Zoning, 

Conventional, 1.4.2(c) 
Ordinance, 1.3.3. 



Variety Store, 
3.6. 

Vegetation, 

vi., 8.1.2(b).; 
Management Area, 8.1.2(d) 

Vehicular, 

Circulation, 1.4.3. 

Viable Use of Land, 
3.1.7. 

Vibration, 
4.1.3.1(h). 



\l\/ 



Warahouse, 
Uses, 4.1 



118 



Glossary 


f 




A 




/ 


A 1 




V. 


L 


-^) 






FUrURE 

UND 

USE 



r 



CxLOSSARY 



1 . Annual Inundation 

The periodic covering of land with water usually occurring annually. 

2. Bikeway 

Any road, path, or way which in some manner is specifically 
designated as being open to bicycle travel regardless of whether such 
facilities are designated for the exclusive use of bicycles or are to 
be shared with other transportation modes. This includes bike lanes, 
wide curb lanes, sidewalks, and local streets. 

5. Factoiy Built Modular 

A residential building comprised of a dwelling unit or habitable room 
which is either wholly manufactured or in substantial part 
manufactured in manufacturing facilities. This does not apply to 
mobile homes. 

4. Canmunity Shopping Center 

The Canmunity Shopping Center is built around a junior department 
store or variety store as the major tenant, in addition to the 
supermarket. Such a center does not have a full line department 
store, althougji it may have a strong specialty or discount store as an 
anchor tenant. (See Section 3.6.) 

5. Gross Residential Density 

Gross residential density is computed by dividing the total number of 
dwelling units on the site by the total area of the residential site. 
The area for computing gross density should include all public and 
institutional land uses (e.g., internal streets, sewer plants, 
schools, parks) located on the site, as well as one-half the ri^ts- 
of-way of the bounding streets (except that major County, State, and 
Interstate Hi^ways are not included in the area for computing gross 
density), as well as one-fourth of the bounding intersections. 

6. Mixed Use Planned Unit Development 

These are relatively large scale real estate projects that are 
characterized by three or more significant revenue-producing uses such 
as retail, office, residential, hotel/motel, or recreation which in 
well-planned projects are mutually supporting. These developments 
include the significant functional and physical integration of project 
components including uninterrupted pedestrian connections. 



121 



7. Mobile Home 

Mobile Home means a structure, transportable in one or more sections 
which is 8 body feet or more in width and which is built on an 
integral chassis, and designed to be used as a dwelling when connected 
to the required utlities, and includes the plumbing, heating, air- 
conditioning, and electrical systems contained therein. 

8. Nei^borhood Shopping Center 

The Nei^borhood Shopping Center provides for the sale of convenience 
goods (food, drugs, and sundries) and personal services, those which 
meet the daily needs of an immediate nei^borhood trade area. A 
supermarket is the principal tenant in the nei^borhood center. (See 
Section 3.7.) 

9. Net Residential Density 

Net residential density is computed by dividing the total number of 

dwelling units on the site by only the area devoted solely to 

residential uses. This method should be used as a measure of 
intensity of land use. 

10. Regional Shopping Center 

The Regional Shopping Center provides goods, general merchandise, 
apparel, furniture, and home furnishings in full depth and variety. 
It is built around the full-line department store, with a minimum 
Gross Leasable Area (GLA) of 300,000 square feet, as the major drawing 
power. Three or more department stores are now being included for 
greater comparative shopping. The normal design uses the pedestrian 
mall, either open or closed, as a connector between the major anchor 
stores. (See Section 3 '5) 

11 . Residential Care Facility 

Ar^y facility used to house individuals in a residential setting who 
have been traditionally housed in an institution. These facilities 
may include: family and group care homes, emergency shelters and 
homes, recovery homes, and residential treatment facilities. 

12. Special Area Study 

A Special Area Study is an analysis of factors that affect the 
development of small areas of Alachua County. The areas may 
be as small as an intersection of roadways or as large as a planning 
district. These studies include the regulation of growth and 
development for the special area. Common uses for Special Area 
Studies may include the location of Future Activity Centers, the 
upgrading of Activity Centers throu^ the low, medium or hi^ • 
hierarchy, or the specific analysis of the impact of development on 
nei^borhoods or conservation areas. These studies, when adopted by 
the Board of County Commissioners, became part of the Comprehensive 
Plan of Alachua County. 



122 



13. Urban Cluster Development 

An Urban Cluster is a concentration of urban development with a 
central city focus. The Urban Cluster concept directs urban type 
development toward areas which are served by existing public facility 
and service improvements (such as potable water and sanitary sewer 
lines) or areas where public facility and service improvements can be 
extended in a logical, orderly, and cost-efficient manner. This 
concept best provides for the hi^est level of service to the greatest 
number of residents at the least possible cost. Land that is 
considered to be within an urban cluster is that which receives thirty- 
one (31 ) or more points as determined by the Residential Density 
Checklist. 



123 



^ 




ALACHUA COUNTY DEPARTMEINT OP 
PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT 

Staff ^^13 

York L . Phillips Director /)/CtcA^A^ 

♦Allan Beidler Planner II j / 

Alvin Lewis Senior Planner <^<^Uj/ 

♦Richard Levey Planner II >^^H^^ 

Wayne Wells Planner I '■ Ra/-- 

Marc DuPree Planning Assistant ^^^ 

♦♦Maureen Skehan Cartographer ^ . ^ 

Juliana Slade Secretary IV 

Linda C. Ange Secretary II 

William Morris Clerk Typist II 



♦Principal Authors 
♦♦Graphics Designer 



ALACHUA COUNTY BOARD OP COUNTY COMMISSIONEE^S 

Members 

Thomas Coward Chairman 

Edwin Turlington Commissioner 

John Schroepfer Ccramissioner 

Leveda Brown Commissioner 

Jane Walker Conmissioner 



ALACHUA COUNTY LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY 

Members 

William T. Coram Chairman 

Dale Thompson Vice Chairman 

Herbert Edwards Secretary 

John Nattress 
Karl Owens 
Predric Shore 
Scott Whi taker 

Earl Starnes^ 

♦Former Commissioner 



. "■- '. 'r^-